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"New-Style" Judicial Campaigns and the Legitimacy of State High Courts
Unformatted Document Text:  -25- Gibson, James L., and Gregory A. Caldeira. 2007a. Citizens, Courts, and Confirmations: Positivity Theory and the Judgments of the American People. Unpublished manuscript, WashingtonUniversity in St. Louis. Gibson, James L., and Gregory A. Caldeira. 2007b. “Supreme Court Nominations, Legitimacy Theory, and the American Public: A Dynamic Test of the Theory of Positivity Bias.” Paper delivered atthe 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, August 30 – September2, 2007, Chicago, IL. Gibson, James L., and Gregory A. Caldeira. 2007c. “Knowing About Courts.” Paper delivered at the 65 Annual National Conference of the Midwest Political Science Association, April 12–15, th 2007, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois. Gibson, James L., Gregory A. Caldeira, and Lester Kenyatta Spence. 2002. “The Role of Theory in Experimental Design: Experiments Without Randomization.” Political Analysis 10 (#4,Autumn): 362-375. (In the Special Issue on Experimental Methods in Political Science). Gibson, James L., Gregory A. Caldeira, and Lester Kenyatta Spence. 2003. “The Supreme Court and the U.S. Presidential Election of 2000: Wounds, Self-Inflicted or Otherwise?” British Journal ofPolitical Science 33: (#4, October): 535-556. Gibson, James L., Gregory A. Caldeira, and Lester Kenyatta Spence. 2005. “Why Do People Accept Public Policies They Oppose? Testing Legitimacy Theory with a Survey-Based Experiment.”Political Research Quarterly 58 (June): 187-201. Gibson, James L., and Amanda Gouws. 1999. “Truth and Reconciliation in South Africa: Attributions of Blame and the Struggle over Apartheid.” American Political Science Review 93 (#3, September):501-517. Gibson, James L., and Amanda Gouws. 2001. “Making Tolerance Judgments: The Effects of Context, Local and National.” The Journal of Politics 63 (#4, November): 1067-1090. Gillman, Howard. 2001. The Votes That Counted: How the Court Decided the 2000 Presidential Election. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. Goldberg, Deborah, Sarah Samis, Edwin Bender, and Rachel Weiss. 2005. The New Politics of Judicial Elections 2004. How Special Interest Pressure on Our Courts Has Reached a “Tipping Point”— and How to Keep Our Courts Fair and Impartial. Washington, D.C.: Justice at StakeCampaign [Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law]. Grosskopf, Anke, and Jeffrey J. Mondak. 1998. “Do Attitudes Toward Specific Supreme Court Decisions Matter? The Impact of Webster and Texas v. Johnson on Public Confidence in the SupremeCourt.” Political Research Quarterly 51 (September): 633-654. Hall, Melinda Gann. 2001. “State Supreme Courts in American Democracy: Probing the Myths of Judicial Reform.” American Political Science Review 95 (#2, June): 315-330. Hall, Melinda Gann. 2007a. “Competition as Accountability in State Supreme Court Elections.” In Running for Judge: The Rising Political, Financial, and Legal Stakes of Judicial Elections.Edited by Matthew J. Streb. New York: New York University Press. Pp. 165-185. Hall, Melinda Gann. 2007b. “Voting in State Supreme Court Elections: Competition and Context as Democratic Incentives.” The Journal of Politics 69 (#4, November): 1147-1159. Hamilton, V. Lee, and Joseph Sanders. 1992. Everyday Justice: Responsibility and the Individual in Japan and the United States. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press. Hasen, Richard L. 2007. “First Amendment Limits on Regulating Judicial Campaigns.” In Running for Judge: The Rising Political, Financial, and Legal Stakes of Judicial Elections. Edited byMatthew J. Streb. New York: New York University Press. Pp. 15-33. Hirsch, Matthew. 2006. “Swing Voter’s Lament: At Least One Case Still Bugs O’Connor.” Law.com, 11/8/2006. Http://www.law.com/jsp/law/LawArticleFriendly.jsp?id=1162893919695 [Visited7/16/2007.]

Authors: Gibson, James.
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background image
-25-
Gibson, James L., and Gregory A. Caldeira. 2007a. Citizens, Courts, and Confirmations: Positivity
Theory and the Judgments of the American People. Unpublished manuscript, Washington
University in St. Louis.
Gibson, James L., and Gregory A. Caldeira. 2007b. “Supreme Court Nominations, Legitimacy Theory,
and the American Public: A Dynamic Test of the Theory of Positivity Bias.” Paper delivered at
the 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, August 30 – September
2, 2007, Chicago, IL.
Gibson, James L., and Gregory A. Caldeira. 2007c. “Knowing About Courts.” Paper delivered at the
65 Annual National Conference of the Midwest Political Science Association, April 12–15,
th
2007, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois.
Gibson, James L., Gregory A. Caldeira, and Lester Kenyatta Spence. 2002. “The Role of Theory in
Experimental Design: Experiments Without Randomization.” Political Analysis 10 (#4,
Autumn): 362-375. (In the Special Issue on Experimental Methods in Political Science).
Gibson, James L., Gregory A. Caldeira, and Lester Kenyatta Spence. 2003. “The Supreme Court and the
U.S. Presidential Election of 2000: Wounds, Self-Inflicted or Otherwise?” British Journal of
Political Science
33: (#4, October): 535-556.
Gibson, James L., Gregory A. Caldeira, and Lester Kenyatta Spence. 2005. “Why Do People Accept
Public Policies They Oppose? Testing Legitimacy Theory with a Survey-Based Experiment.”
Political Research Quarterly 58 (June): 187-201.
Gibson, James L., and Amanda Gouws. 1999. “Truth and Reconciliation in South Africa: Attributions of
Blame and the Struggle over Apartheid.” American Political Science Review 93 (#3, September):
501-517.
Gibson, James L., and Amanda Gouws. 2001. “Making Tolerance Judgments: The Effects of Context,
Local and National.” The Journal of Politics 63 (#4, November): 1067-1090.
Gillman, Howard. 2001. The Votes That Counted: How the Court Decided the 2000 Presidential
Election. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.
Goldberg, Deborah, Sarah Samis, Edwin Bender, and Rachel Weiss. 2005. The New Politics of Judicial
Elections 2004. How Special Interest Pressure on Our Courts Has Reached a “Tipping Point”
— and How to Keep Our Courts Fair and Impartial
. Washington, D.C.: Justice at Stake
Campaign [Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law].
Grosskopf, Anke, and Jeffrey J. Mondak. 1998. “Do Attitudes Toward Specific Supreme Court Decisions
Matter? The Impact of Webster and Texas v. Johnson on Public Confidence in the Supreme
Court.” Political Research Quarterly 51 (September): 633-654.
Hall, Melinda Gann. 2001. “State Supreme Courts in American Democracy: Probing the Myths of
Judicial Reform.” American Political Science Review 95 (#2, June): 315-330.
Hall, Melinda Gann. 2007a. “Competition as Accountability in State Supreme Court Elections.” In
Running for Judge: The Rising Political, Financial, and Legal Stakes of Judicial Elections.
Edited by Matthew J. Streb. New York: New York University Press. Pp. 165-185.
Hall, Melinda Gann. 2007b. “Voting in State Supreme Court Elections: Competition and Context as
Democratic Incentives.” The Journal of Politics 69 (#4, November): 1147-1159.
Hamilton, V. Lee, and Joseph Sanders. 1992. Everyday Justice: Responsibility and the Individual in
Japan and the United States. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press.
Hasen, Richard L. 2007. “First Amendment Limits on Regulating Judicial Campaigns.” In Running for
Judge: The Rising Political, Financial, and Legal Stakes of Judicial Elections. Edited by
Matthew J. Streb. New York: New York University Press. Pp. 15-33.
Hirsch, Matthew. 2006. “Swing Voter’s Lament: At Least One Case Still Bugs O’Connor.” Law.com,
11/8/2006. Http://www.law.com/jsp/law/LawArticleFriendly.jsp?id=1162893919695 [Visited
7/16/2007.]


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