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Campaign Advertising, Issue Environments, and Latino Political Behavior in 2004 House Elections
Unformatted Document Text:  7 utilize 2003-2004 Wisconsin Advertising Project data on the density of political advertisements on immigration. 2 The Wisconsin data include all television advertisements that aired in gubernatorial, House, and Senate races in the 100 largest U.S. media markets for the 2003-2004 election cycle, and contain information including media market, ad length, date, time, and content for each advertisement. Importantly, each advertisement is also coded to a specific House district, allowing for easy geo-coding. For each advertisement, the dataset contains codes for up to four issues mentioned, with the most important or dominant issue coded first, and the least important coded last. In order to create a measure of immigration issue salience for 2004 House elections, I created a variable capturing the frequency of advertisements in which immigration was the first – or dominant – issue, followed by similar measures for frequency of advertisements in which immigration was the second, third, or fourth issue. As a result, I have two measures – by congressional district, a measure of how many advertisements were aired in which the dominant or initial issue mentioned was immigration, as well as a summed measure representing the total number of advertisements mentioning immigration at any point during the spot. This aggregate-level measure of immigration advertising density must be matched to individual-level self-reports of political behavior in order to test the hypotheses. As of 2005 U.S. Census Bureau population estimates, those self-identifying as Latino or Hispanic represented 14.4 percent of the U.S. population. Despite large populations in several states, it is difficult to obtain a nationally representative sample of Latinos that is large enough to allow for reasonable analysis into relevant subgroups (e.g. citizens vs. noncitizens, native born vs. non-native born, 2 The data were obtained from a project of the University of Wisconsin Advertising Project includes media tracking data from TNSMI/Campaign Media Analysis Group in Washington, D.C. The University of Wisconsin Advertising Project was sponsored by a grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts. The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the University of Wisconsin Advertising Project or The Pew Charitable Trusts.

Authors: Keane, Michael.
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7
utilize 2003-2004 Wisconsin Advertising Project data on the density of political advertisements
on immigration.
2
The Wisconsin data include all television advertisements that aired in
gubernatorial, House, and Senate races in the 100 largest U.S. media markets for the 2003-2004
election cycle, and contain information including media market, ad length, date, time, and
content for each advertisement. Importantly, each advertisement is also coded to a specific
House district, allowing for easy geo-coding. For each advertisement, the dataset contains codes
for up to four issues mentioned, with the most important or dominant issue coded first, and the
least important coded last. In order to create a measure of immigration issue salience for 2004
House elections, I created a variable capturing the frequency of advertisements in which
immigration was the first – or dominant – issue, followed by similar measures for frequency of
advertisements in which immigration was the second, third, or fourth issue. As a result, I have
two measures – by congressional district, a measure of how many advertisements were aired in
which the dominant or initial issue mentioned was immigration, as well as a summed measure
representing the total number of advertisements mentioning immigration at any point during the
spot.
This aggregate-level measure of immigration advertising density must be matched to
individual-level self-reports of political behavior in order to test the hypotheses. As of 2005 U.S.
Census Bureau population estimates, those self-identifying as Latino or Hispanic represented
14.4 percent of the U.S. population. Despite large populations in several states, it is difficult to
obtain a nationally representative sample of Latinos that is large enough to allow for reasonable
analysis into relevant subgroups (e.g. citizens vs. noncitizens, native born vs. non-native born,
2
The data were obtained from a project of the University of Wisconsin Advertising Project includes media tracking
data from TNSMI/Campaign Media Analysis Group in Washington, D.C. The University of Wisconsin Advertising
Project was sponsored by a grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts. The opinions expressed in this article are those of
the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the University of Wisconsin Advertising Project or The Pew
Charitable Trusts.


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