All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Campaign Finance: Timing and Its Torments
Unformatted Document Text:  same party who want to unseat an incumbent. These members can be motivated by partisan or personal loyalties that extend beyond rational considerations about whether the candidate is viable. Those who give primarily for purposive goals have strong desire to get a like-minded candidate in office. They should be more willing than donors motivated by material incentives to support challengers early. These donors include ideological PACs, party committees and, to some extent, leadership PACs. Political parties, above all, should be lead donors because of their unique situation. While interest groups, candidates, and individual donors seek certain personal or policy objectives, party organizations are primarily interested in the collective goal of controlling government. In the case of Congress, this requires winning as many individual congressional races as possible. However, party leaders face strong organizational and institutional constraints (mentioned above) that encourage them to distribute campaign resources rationally, but late in the race to those candidates who have put themselves in position to win (Cantor and Herrnson 1997; Glasgow 2002; Jacobson 1985; Kolodny 1998), In this sense, the parties’ purposive goals are subordinated to the simple goal of winning any race they can, regardless of the policy positions of the candidate. Ideological groups, in contrast, are willing to take a chance early to support someone who champions their cause, not only because it might lead to electing the candidate, but because the candidate will raise issues of importance to the group during the campaign. Finally, donors motivated by material incentives should be laggards. These donors have pragmatic “bread and butter” interests that they do not want to jeopardize by taking a risk on a challenger early in the electoral cycle. Such donors are primarily interested in

Authors: McGhee, Eric. and La Raja, Raymond.
first   previous   Page 9 of 25   next   last



background image
same party who want to unseat an incumbent. These members can be motivated by
partisan or personal loyalties that extend beyond rational considerations about whether
the candidate is viable.
Those who give primarily for purposive goals have strong desire to get a like-minded
candidate in office. They should be more willing than donors motivated by material
incentives to support challengers early. These donors include ideological PACs, party
committees and, to some extent, leadership PACs. Political parties, above all, should be
lead donors because of their unique situation. While interest groups, candidates, and
individual donors seek certain personal or policy objectives, party organizations are
primarily interested in the collective goal of controlling government. In the case of
Congress, this requires winning as many individual congressional races as possible.
However, party leaders face strong organizational and institutional constraints
(mentioned above) that encourage them to distribute campaign resources rationally, but
late in the race to those candidates who have put themselves in position to win (Cantor
and Herrnson 1997; Glasgow 2002; Jacobson 1985; Kolodny 1998), In this sense, the
parties’ purposive goals are subordinated to the simple goal of winning any race they can,
regardless of the policy positions of the candidate. Ideological groups, in contrast, are
willing to take a chance early to support someone who champions their cause, not only
because it might lead to electing the candidate, but because the candidate will raise issues
of importance to the group during the campaign.
Finally, donors motivated by material incentives should be laggards. These donors
have pragmatic “bread and butter” interests that they do not want to jeopardize by taking
a risk on a challenger early in the electoral cycle. Such donors are primarily interested in


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 9 of 25   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.