All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Fear and Learning in the Illegal Immigration Debate
Unformatted Document Text:  information. We also suggest that anxiety may not override political identities in the way implicated by the AI theory. In particular, group identity and partisanship may significantly influence information processing by means of motivated reasoning. Particularly because group identity and prejudice inform the immigration debate (Citrin et al 1997) and large portions of immigration news and rhetoric references particular ethnic groups, we expect that subjects’ own group identity will influence information processing. In the face of fear appeals about immigration, we may not expect that Latinos, whites, and African Americans will disregard their group identities in searching for or evaluating immigration stories. Previous scholars find that both in-group and out-group identities can influence political beliefs and choices (Brady and Sniderman 1985; Conover 1988; Converse 1964,1975; Kinder 2003). Converse (1964) theorized that citizens may use group membership as reference point to form meaningful political attitudes when they are aware of the group and there is information available to link a policy or party to a group. Thus, identity with a racial group may serve as the basis for an “ideology by proxy” (Converse 1975) for citizens whereby they interpret new information through this ideological prism. Kinder (2003) finds that group identification and views of other groups matter significantly in immigration policy. He demonstrates that ethnocentrism, or the belief that one’s own ethnic/racial group is superior to others, significantly decreases support for immigration and increases beliefs that immigrants drive up tax burdens and take jobs. The “interstitial linkage” that Converse deemed a necessary condition for group membership playing a role in political cognition is met in the case of Latinos. In a 2007 Gallup Poll, 31 % of Latinos named immigration policy as the country’s most important problem where lower percentages of whites and blacks named immigration as a top problem. When group cues 7

Authors: Gadarian, Shana. and Albertson, Bethany.
first   previous   Page 7 of 40   next   last



background image
information. We also suggest that anxiety may not override political identities in the way
implicated by the AI theory. In particular, group identity and partisanship may significantly
influence information processing by means of motivated reasoning.
Particularly because group identity and prejudice inform the immigration debate (Citrin
et al 1997) and large portions of immigration news and rhetoric references particular ethnic
groups, we expect that subjects’ own group identity will influence information processing. In the
face of fear appeals about immigration, we may not expect that Latinos, whites, and African
Americans will disregard their group identities in searching for or evaluating immigration
stories. Previous scholars find that both in-group and out-group identities can influence political
beliefs and choices (Brady and Sniderman 1985; Conover 1988; Converse 1964,1975; Kinder
2003). Converse (1964) theorized that citizens may use group membership as reference point to
form meaningful political attitudes when they are aware of the group and there is information
available to link a policy or party to a group. Thus, identity with a racial group may serve as the
basis for an “ideology by proxy” (Converse 1975) for citizens whereby they interpret new
information through this ideological prism. Kinder (2003) finds that group identification and
views of other groups matter significantly in immigration policy. He demonstrates that
ethnocentrism, or the belief that one’s own ethnic/racial group is superior to others, significantly
decreases support for immigration and increases beliefs that immigrants drive up tax burdens and
take jobs.
The “interstitial linkage” that Converse deemed a necessary condition for group
membership playing a role in political cognition is met in the case of Latinos. In a 2007 Gallup
Poll, 31 % of Latinos named immigration policy as the country’s most important problem where
lower percentages of whites and blacks named immigration as a top problem. When group cues
7


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 7 of 40   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.