All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Fear and Learning in the Illegal Immigration Debate
Unformatted Document Text:  policy attitudes increase anxiety, then we should expect that anxiety will motivate citizens to search for confirmatory, one-sided evidence rather than more broad and balanced information, but this should only be the case for citizens with strongly held prior beliefs. It might be then be the case that information search is not only be biased by vigilance to threatening information but also by selective attention to information that matches predispositions. We hypothesize that group identification can form the basis for those previous attitudes, and thus may lead Latinos to process information through motivated reasoning – to either look for confirmatory evidence or to counterargue with negative information about immigration. Partisanship provides an additional and related source of bias in information processing. Literature in political science from The American Voter onward demonstrates the strength of partisanship as a “perceptual screen” through which citizens process political information (Bartels 2002; Campbell et al 1960; Zaller 1992). Partisans exhibit resistance to information inconsistent with beliefs as well as factual information that would necessitate updating evaluations, and this bias is not mitigated by high levels of knowledge (Zaller 1992; Bartels 2002; Shani 2006). In Bartels’s words, partisanship “is not merely a running tally of political assessments, but a pervasive dynamic force shaping citizens’ perceptions of, and reactions to, the political world” (138). Although we may be less concerned about the biasing influence of the partisan screen to the extent that opinions on immigration policy are also shaped by economic, geographical, and ideological factors (Pew 2006), within our analyses we will consider the way that partisanship may influence engagement with information. There appears to be nearly as much disagreement within parties as between parties over immigration, meaning that the partisan bias might be attenuated on this particular policy issue, yet, our analyses will consider how partisanship may moderate information processing and gathering. 9

Authors: Gadarian, Shana. and Albertson, Bethany.
first   previous   Page 9 of 40   next   last



background image
policy attitudes increase anxiety, then we should expect that anxiety will motivate citizens to
search for confirmatory, one-sided evidence rather than more broad and balanced information,
but this should only be the case for citizens with strongly held prior beliefs. It might be then be
the case that information search is not only be biased by vigilance to threatening information but
also by selective attention to information that matches predispositions. We hypothesize that
group identification can form the basis for those previous attitudes, and thus may lead Latinos to
process information through motivated reasoning – to either look for confirmatory evidence or
to counterargue with negative information about immigration.
Partisanship provides an additional and related source of bias in information processing.
Literature in political science from The American Voter onward demonstrates the strength of
partisanship as a “perceptual screen” through which citizens process political information
(Bartels 2002; Campbell et al 1960; Zaller 1992). Partisans exhibit resistance to information
inconsistent with beliefs as well as factual information that would necessitate updating
evaluations, and this bias is not mitigated by high levels of knowledge (Zaller 1992; Bartels
2002; Shani 2006). In Bartels’s words, partisanship “is not merely a running tally of political
assessments, but a pervasive dynamic force shaping citizens’ perceptions of, and reactions to, the
political world” (138). Although we may be less concerned about the biasing influence of the
partisan screen to the extent that opinions on immigration policy are also shaped by economic,
geographical, and ideological factors (Pew 2006), within our analyses we will consider the way
that partisanship may influence engagement with information. There appears to be nearly as
much disagreement within parties as between parties over immigration, meaning that the partisan
bias might be attenuated on this particular policy issue, yet, our analyses will consider how
partisanship may moderate information processing and gathering.
9


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 9 of 40   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.