All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

'It Takes Money to Buy Whiskey' : Local Energy Systems and Civic Participation
Unformatted Document Text:  In part, Funk’s work is a response to the hegemony of the rational choice model that has largely characterized the participation literature in recent years. As Funk points out, however, there is no necessary choice between the two, since what drives participation is not either altruism or calculating self-interest, but “a mix of desires to benefit the self and others” (1998, 604). Our framework for interpreting motivations for participation in community-based energy therefore draws upon both of these motivational possibilities. According to Verba, Schlozman, and Brady, there are four kinds of motivations for political activity. Three of the four motivations are selective benefits, that is, benefits that citizens could accrue only if they actually participated in the activity. The first such benefit of a selective nature is material benefits, such as jobs, career advancement, or help with a personal problem. This benefit of participation is more tangible than the other two selective benefits of social gratification and civic gratification. With social gratification, a citizen receives the enjoyment of working with others, and the excitement of politics as a reward for participation. Civic gratification, or feeling a sense of duty or fulfilling a desire to contribute to the welfare of one’s community, which might be construed as Funk’s “societal interest value orientation”, is another example of a benefit related to the act of participation itself. The final motivation identified by Verba, Schlozman, and Brady (1995) is the desire to influence policy outcomes, described as feelings of gratification that come from the implementation of desired policies. There is no doubt that the CERTs project has developed a highly devoted cadre of participants. Thus, most of the 2007 survey respondents have been involved in CERTs for three years (35 percent), followed by two years (28 percent), and then one year (18 12

Authors: High-Pippert, Angela. and Hoffman, Steven.
first   previous   Page 12 of 28   next   last



background image
In part, Funk’s work is a response to the hegemony of the rational choice model
that has largely characterized the participation literature in recent years. As Funk points
out, however, there is no necessary choice between the two, since what drives
participation is not either altruism or calculating self-interest, but “a mix of desires to
benefit the self and others” (1998, 604). Our framework for interpreting motivations for
participation in community-based energy therefore draws upon both of these motivational
possibilities.
According to Verba, Schlozman, and Brady, there are four kinds of motivations
for political activity. Three of the four motivations are selective benefits, that is, benefits
that citizens could accrue only if they actually participated in the activity. The first such
benefit of a selective nature is material benefits, such as jobs, career advancement, or
help with a personal problem. This benefit of participation is more tangible than the
other two selective benefits of social gratification and civic gratification. With social
gratification, a citizen receives the enjoyment of working with others, and the excitement
of politics as a reward for participation. Civic gratification, or feeling a sense of duty or
fulfilling a desire to contribute to the welfare of one’s community, which might be
construed as Funk’s “societal interest value orientation”, is another example of a benefit
related to the act of participation itself. The final motivation identified by Verba,
Schlozman, and Brady (1995) is the desire to influence policy outcomes, described as
feelings of gratification that come from the implementation of desired policies.
There is no doubt that the CERTs project has developed a highly devoted cadre of
participants. Thus, most of the 2007 survey respondents have been involved in CERTs
for three years (35 percent), followed by two years (28 percent), and then one year (18
12


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 12 of 28   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.