All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Fall Into the (Knowledge) Gap: An Examination of the Political Knowledge of Adolescents in Co-Educational and Single Sex Environments
Unformatted Document Text:  that such classrooms benefit girls by relieving them from the pressures of overly sexualized environments. The public discourse has resulted in several policy changes designed to make it easier for public school districts to implement single-gender classrooms and schools (e.g., Michigan Act No. 303, 2006; U.S. Department of Education 2005). Research on the outcomes of single-sex education does not strongly endorse such classrooms, however. Some studies suggest that low-income children in urban schools learn better when separated from the opposite sex (Riordan 1994, Garcia 1998), but the effects appear to be limited to certain students and certain circumstances (Lee and Bryk 1986; Lee and Lockheed 1990; Woodward, Fergusson, and Horwood 1999). There is even less research on the effects of single-gender schools on political orientations, but the logic would seem to push in the same direction. If single-sex classrooms allow boys and girls to more effectively learn science, math, and language arts, then they should also allow more effective learning of political information. Consider Verba, Burns and Schlozman’s (1997) argument that the dominance of men in both politics and sports conveys the message that both endeavors are men’s games. If single-sex schools offer more opportunities for girls to succeed in both sports and leadership, then we should find that the gap between boys and girls is less in single-sex environments than in coeducational schools. If, instead, single-gender schools reinforce traditional gender stereotypes (Datnow, Hubby and Woody 2001), then we might expect that they would also exacerbate sex differences in political knowledge. While the primary focus of this study is the effect of the school environment on levels of political knowledge, particularly whether the effects differ for boys and girls, we also consider other influences that include additional aspects of school, home environment characteristics, and individual attributes. We begin with a review of the these variables in prior literature, consider the results for similar political knowledge questions in previous studies, and then examine the mean differences in political knowledge by the main categorical variables of interests: the student’s sex, the gendered nature of the school, and whether the school is Catholic or public. Finally we move to a more detailed, multivariate analysis and a discussion on the implications of our results. 3

Authors: Prough, Elizabeth. and Herring, Mary.
first   previous   Page 3 of 25   next   last



background image
that such classrooms benefit girls by relieving them from the pressures of overly
sexualized environments. The public discourse has resulted in several policy changes
designed to make it easier for public school districts to implement single-gender
classrooms and schools (e.g., Michigan Act No. 303, 2006; U.S. Department of
Education 2005).
Research on the outcomes of single-sex education does not strongly endorse such
classrooms, however. Some studies suggest that low-income children in urban schools
learn better when separated from the opposite sex (Riordan 1994, Garcia 1998), but the
effects appear to be limited to certain students and certain circumstances (Lee and Bryk
1986; Lee and Lockheed 1990; Woodward, Fergusson, and Horwood 1999).
There is even less research on the effects of single-gender schools on political
orientations, but the logic would seem to push in the same direction. If single-sex
classrooms allow boys and girls to more effectively learn science, math, and language
arts, then they should also allow more effective learning of political information.
Consider Verba, Burns and Schlozman’s (1997) argument that the dominance of men in
both politics and sports conveys the message that both endeavors are men’s games. If
single-sex schools offer more opportunities for girls to succeed in both sports and
leadership, then we should find that the gap between boys and girls is less in single-sex
environments than in coeducational schools. If, instead, single-gender schools reinforce
traditional gender stereotypes (Datnow, Hubby and Woody 2001), then we might expect
that they would also exacerbate sex differences in political knowledge.
While the primary focus of this study is the effect of the school environment on
levels of political knowledge, particularly whether the effects differ for boys and girls, we
also consider other influences that include additional aspects of school, home
environment characteristics, and individual attributes. We begin with a review of the
these variables in prior literature, consider the results for similar political knowledge
questions in previous studies, and then examine the mean differences in political
knowledge by the main categorical variables of interests: the student’s sex, the gendered
nature of the school, and whether the school is Catholic or public. Finally we move to a
more detailed, multivariate analysis and a discussion on the implications of our results.
3


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 3 of 25   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.