All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Familiarity Doesn’t Breed Contempt: Polish Attitudes Toward European Integration in a Comparative Perspective
Unformatted Document Text:  mainly understood by 1. economy, and 2. culture, while there were very few comments on the political dimension. On the contrary, the focus group in Zielona Góra was very pragmatic. The EU meant ‘concrete things’ it affected ‘life in a concrete way, money, travelling abroad, concrete things’. Differing from the first group, no one spoke of chances or culture, the EU seemed to have brought concrete changes in their lives, and the word ‘concrete’ was pronounced with emphasis. The EU was represented in people’s perceptions by the double component of affective and utilitarian dimensions, as also the quantitative analysis detected. Citizens of Central and Eastern Europe had a generally positive image, and together with the idea that benefits were going to be materialised, all these factors structured citizens’ attitudes toward the EU. The focus groups presented the two positive attitudes: the emphasis in the first focus group was on chances and values – general positive - in the second on concrete things – economically positive. At the end of the discussion the first focus group discussed on the general benefits. ‘Travelling’ was the first cited benefit, even though in April they still complained about the passport controls defined as ‘terrible’. Benefits seemed to refer to the family level, and while aware of the benefits, they underlined the costs as well, ‘…generally we can consider the benefits, yes, there were costs, as the increase in price growth’ but still they felt ‘safer as consumers, for the standardisation to the EU norms, products should be safer’ and they referred to product ‘labels’. In Zielona Góra, the geographical location of the region impacted on the perceived benefits. The group talked about ‘the exports of some products’, and the general benefits ‘for farmers, for some workers’, but generally for Poland - ‘You can now legally work abroad’. Furthermore, focus groups gave evidence that information matters, and support on its own is not sufficient to give legitimacy to further processes of EU integration. Less educated citizens can have doubts and concerns, and be more sensitive to Eurosceptic parties and sources of information, but also highly educated people can perceive they do not have sufficient information in order to make a choice when voting, and possibly reject the EU issue at hand, because they feel uncertain. In the run-up to the accession referendum, a broad information campaign was launched and monitored, particularly by the Office of the Committee for European Integration (Urząd Komitet Integracji Europejskiej: UKIE) and the Institute of Public Affairs (Instytut Spraw Publicznych: ISP). Leaflets and posters were particularly important, and 40% of Polish citizens found them useful (Cziężka 2005: 169). The main organisation involved in the campaign was the Office of the Committee for European Integration. After the referendum 17

Authors: Guerra, Simona.
first   previous   Page 17 of 29   next   last



background image
mainly understood by 1. economy, and 2. culture, while there were very few comments on the
political dimension. On the contrary, the focus group in Zielona Góra was very pragmatic.
The EU meant ‘concrete things’ it affected ‘life in a concrete way, money, travelling abroad,
concrete things’. Differing from the first group, no one spoke of chances or culture, the EU
seemed to have brought concrete changes in their lives, and the word ‘concrete’ was
pronounced with emphasis. The EU was represented in people’s perceptions by the double
component of affective and utilitarian dimensions, as also the quantitative analysis detected.
Citizens of Central and Eastern Europe had a generally positive image, and together with the
idea that benefits were going to be materialised, all these factors structured citizens’ attitudes
toward the EU. The focus groups presented the two positive attitudes: the emphasis in the
first focus group was on chances and values – general positive - in the second on concrete
things – economically positive.
At the end of the discussion the first focus group discussed on the general benefits.
‘Travelling’ was the first cited benefit, even though in April they still complained about the
passport controls defined as ‘terrible’. Benefits seemed to refer to the family level, and while
aware of the benefits, they underlined the costs as well, ‘…generally we can consider the
benefits, yes, there were costs, as the increase in price growth’ but still they felt ‘safer as
consumers, for the standardisation to the EU norms, products should be safer’ and they
referred to product ‘labels’. In Zielona Góra, the geographical location of the region impacted
on the perceived benefits. The group talked about ‘the exports of some products’, and the
general benefits ‘for farmers, for some workers’, but generally for Poland - ‘You can now
legally work abroad’.
Furthermore, focus groups gave evidence that information matters, and support on its own
is not sufficient to give legitimacy to further processes of EU integration. Less educated
citizens can have doubts and concerns, and be more sensitive to Eurosceptic parties and
sources of information, but also highly educated people can perceive they do not have
sufficient information in order to make a choice when voting, and possibly reject the EU issue
at hand, because they feel uncertain.
In the run-up to the accession referendum, a broad information campaign was launched and
monitored, particularly by the Office of the Committee for European Integration (Urząd
Komitet Integracji Europejskiej: UKIE) and the Institute of Public Affairs (Instytut Spraw
Publicznych: ISP). Leaflets and posters were particularly important, and 40% of Polish
citizens found them useful (Cziężka 2005: 169). The main organisation involved in the
campaign was the Office of the Committee for European Integration. After the referendum
17


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 17 of 29   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.