All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Economic Interests and Public Support for the Euro
Unformatted Document Text:  13 The 2007 EB survey includes several items that allow us to test the euro’s economic impact. These include an item asking respondents to identify the current inflation rate. Reflecting a substantial degree of ambivalence, just over half the sample, 51 percent, were not able to provide an estimate. Within the eurozone, 22 percent estimated the inflation rate between two and five percent while 12 percent estimated it above five percent. Outside the eurozone, citizens were more likely to estimate a higher rate; 25 percent estimated a rate above five percent. Because we are interested in how perceptions of prices influence support for the euro, we are not concerned that many respondents could not estimate the rate or provide a correct estimate. Of economic concepts, citizens do seem to have the greatest understanding of and knowledge about inflation (Walstad 1997). Another item asks respondents to assess the current situation of the national economy ranging from very good (+2) to very bad (-2). Those without an opinion are placed in the middle of the scale (0). A third economic variable measures assessments of economic stability based on responses to the following question, “I feel we are more stable economically because (our country) is a member of the EU.” The variable is dichotomous, where those agreeing with the statement are coded as “1” and “0” otherwise. Overall, about 54 percent agreed that the EU has made their country more stable economically. We also include dummy variables for citizens who are out of the labor force who are either unemployed, retired, or full time students. To assess the impact of identity, we rely on an item measuring the strength of attachment to country and the European Union. Those responding that they are “very attached” are coded as a “1”, while others are coded as “0”. To control for general support for the EU, we rely on an item that measures whether citizens believe their country’s membership is a

Authors: Banducci, Susan., Karp, Jeffrey. and Loedel, Peter.
first   previous   Page 14 of 24   next   last



background image
13
The 2007 EB survey includes several items that allow us to test the euro’s
economic impact. These include an item asking respondents to identify the current
inflation rate. Reflecting a substantial degree of ambivalence, just over half the
sample, 51 percent, were not able to provide an estimate. Within the eurozone, 22
percent estimated the inflation rate between two and five percent while 12 percent
estimated it above five percent. Outside the eurozone, citizens were more likely to
estimate a higher rate; 25 percent estimated a rate above five percent. Because we are
interested in how perceptions of prices influence support for the euro, we are not
concerned that many respondents could not estimate the rate or provide a correct
estimate. Of economic concepts, citizens do seem to have the greatest understanding
of and knowledge about inflation (Walstad 1997).
Another item asks respondents to assess the current situation of the national
economy ranging from very good (+2) to very bad (-2). Those without an opinion are
placed in the middle of the scale (0). A third economic variable measures assessments
of economic stability based on responses to the following question, “I feel we are
more stable economically because (our country) is a member of the EU.” The variable
is dichotomous, where those agreeing with the statement are coded as “1” and “0”
otherwise. Overall, about 54 percent agreed that the EU has made their country more
stable economically. We also include dummy variables for citizens who are out of the
labor force who are either unemployed, retired, or full time students. To assess the
impact of identity, we rely on an item measuring the strength of attachment to country
and the European Union. Those responding that they are “very attached” are coded as
a “1”, while others are coded as “0”. To control for general support for the EU, we
rely on an item that measures whether citizens believe their country’s membership is a


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 14 of 24   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.