All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Ideas as Building Blocks of a Path: Islamic Challenge to the pro-Western Turkish Foreign Policy, 1996-1997
Unformatted Document Text:  of path dependence, as it addresses the workings of laissez-faire markets, is that market choices can stick us on undesirable paths.” (1999, 984) It is argued that this claim about inefficiencies of paths is one of the most appealing or intriguing sides of path dependence because it is a direct challenge to the conventional economic models in which rational actors are able to pursue profit maximization and avoid inefficiencies. This study is not interested in the validity of these claims. However, these concerns about efficiency, increasing returns, or costs and benefits of the existing path provide clear evidence to the utilitarian, materialist bias of the approach. Using the words of Mahoney, “Most economists assume that utilitarian mechanisms of cost-benefit analysis underpin processes of institutional reproduction once an increasing returns process has been initiated.” (2000, 508) This bias towards materialist factors in PDA is not limited to its applications in its birthplace (i.e. institutional economics). We see the same tendency in political studies. For instance, Pierson, who provided the most systematic studies of path dependence in political science, adopts the same ‘increasing returns’ logic in economics and applies it to political matters (see Pierson, 2000 and 2004). Pierson states that: In an increasing returns process, the probability of further steps along the same path increases with each move down that path. This is because the relative benefits of the current activity compared with other possible options increase over time. To put it a different way, the costs of exit- of switching to some previously plausible alternative- rise (2000, 252) Another example to this materialist understanding of path dependence in political studies would be Alexander’s (2001) study of democratic consolidation. According to this study, despite short-run costs, actors stick to the path due to expected improvements in the long- run. One more example would be Ganghof’s (2007) study of the economic and political viability of extremely high income taxation in Denmark. In the words of Ganghof, one reason for the viability of high income taxation in Danish case is that “there is a large 8

Authors: Sarigil, Zeki.
first   previous   Page 8 of 37   next   last



background image
of path dependence, as it addresses the workings of laissez-faire markets, is that market
choices can stick us on undesirable paths.” (1999, 984) It is argued that this claim about
inefficiencies of paths is one of the most appealing or intriguing sides of path dependence
because it is a direct challenge to the conventional economic models in which rational
actors are able to pursue profit maximization and avoid inefficiencies. This study is not
interested in the validity of these claims. However, these concerns about efficiency,
increasing returns, or costs and benefits of the existing path provide clear evidence to the
utilitarian, materialist bias of the approach. Using the words of Mahoney, “Most
economists assume that utilitarian mechanisms of cost-benefit analysis underpin
processes of institutional reproduction once an increasing returns process has been
initiated.” (2000, 508)
This bias towards materialist factors in PDA is not limited to its applications in its
birthplace (i.e. institutional economics). We see the same tendency in political studies.
For instance, Pierson, who provided the most systematic studies of path dependence in
political science, adopts the same ‘increasing returns’ logic in economics and applies it to
political matters (see Pierson, 2000 and 2004). Pierson states that:
In an increasing returns process, the probability of further steps along the same path
increases with each move down that path. This is because the relative benefits of the current
activity compared with other possible options increase over time. To put it a different way,
the costs of exit- of switching to some previously plausible alternative- rise (2000, 252)
Another example to this materialist understanding of path dependence in political studies
would be Alexander’s (2001) study of democratic consolidation. According to this study,
despite short-run costs, actors stick to the path due to expected improvements in the long-
run. One more example would be Ganghof’s (2007) study of the economic and political
viability of extremely high income taxation in Denmark. In the words of Ganghof, one
reason for the viability of high income taxation in Danish case is that “there is a large
8


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 8 of 37   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.