All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Economic Inequality in the ‘Democratic’ Nepal: Dimensions and Implications
Unformatted Document Text:  20 These estimates support the argument that those who could harness the opportunities provided by the liberalization policies of the 1990s and beyond were able to rapidly maximize their payoffs. But it is in the urban areas where the inequality of unadjusted income increased more rapidly, substantiating the thesis that the unfortunate folks in the countryside as well as in urban areas happened to lose considerably over the period. (Insert Table 8 here) It is interesting to observe that the inequality of wealth declined in urban as well as rural areas. The drop, however, was much more significant in rural areas. On the face value, it contradicts the observed income inequality trend, as a wider inequality of income would further escalate the inequality in wealth. Although the inequality of wealth declined, owing to the broader political instability at the national level, urban areas appear to resist any decline, thus partly shielding the national wave of declining inequality. The five development regions manifest various degrees of within-region inequality. Estimates reported in Table 9 show that inequality is consistently higher in the Center region, followed by the West, with the Far-West region registering the least degree of inequality. The eight years covered also saw varied distributional patterns, with inequality in the West declining slightly and yet increasing to various degrees in other regions. While the inequality of unadjusted income may be rising faster in the Center than in other regions, the Mid-West even seeing a sizable drop, the within region inequality trend appears to be in line with the inter-region inequality discussed earlier. Where as the inequality of wealth runs relatively higher in the Center, it appears to be either relatively stagnant or falling in all five regions over time. This, however, appears to be falling more rapidly in the Center, an observation that does not readily align with the relatively smaller drop in wealth inequality in urban areas (Table 8), perhaps suggesting that inequality

Authors: Wagle, Udaya.
first   previous   Page 20 of 45   next   last



background image
20
These estimates support the argument that those who could harness the opportunities provided by
the liberalization policies of the 1990s and beyond were able to rapidly maximize their payoffs.
But it is in the urban areas where the inequality of unadjusted income increased more rapidly,
substantiating the thesis that the unfortunate folks in the countryside as well as in urban areas
happened to lose considerably over the period.
(Insert Table 8 here)
It is interesting to observe that the inequality of wealth declined in urban as well as rural areas.
The drop, however, was much more significant in rural areas. On the face value, it contradicts
the observed income inequality trend, as a wider inequality of income would further escalate the
inequality in wealth. Although the inequality of wealth declined, owing to the broader political
instability at the national level, urban areas appear to resist any decline, thus partly shielding the
national wave of declining inequality.
The five development regions manifest various degrees of within-region inequality. Estimates
reported in Table 9 show that inequality is consistently higher in the Center region, followed by
the West, with the Far-West region registering the least degree of inequality. The eight years
covered also saw varied distributional patterns, with inequality in the West declining slightly and
yet increasing to various degrees in other regions. While the inequality of unadjusted income
may be rising faster in the Center than in other regions, the Mid-West even seeing a sizable drop,
the within region inequality trend appears to be in line with the inter-region inequality discussed
earlier. Where as the inequality of wealth runs relatively higher in the Center, it appears to be
either relatively stagnant or falling in all five regions over time. This, however, appears to be
falling more rapidly in the Center, an observation that does not readily align with the relatively
smaller drop in wealth inequality in urban areas (Table 8), perhaps suggesting that inequality


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 20 of 45   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.