All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Dealing with Poverty: Change and Continuity in Argentine Social Policies
Unformatted Document Text:  frameworks are not so easy to change in the short term. For example, the difficulty in understanding the subjects of the policies in different ways (i.e. as people in situations of poverty instead of “the poor”, as “rights holders” instead of “beneficiaries”, as “participants” instead of “recipients”) 44 and, correlatively, the difficulty in imagining alternative types of state intervention on the margins. We shall see how this cultural limitation, embedded in the technical socialization of state actors, is intertwined with what we will call “limits from below”. Indeed, the ways in which state actors construct the subjects and situations of intervention is mutually determined by the ways social groups understand their relation with the state. b) Limits from below The limits from below derive, first, from an inherited cultural imaginary on the relationship with the state on the part of vulnerable social groups. This imaginary is relational and historically constructed. I mean that perceptions about state obligations and about the types of strategies to perform them are mutually constructed in a circular relation between state responses and social demands. To certain extend, we could say that there is always some kind of shared image of state between state decision-makers and the social sectors to which the policies are addressed. Therefore, the question is what kind of shared culture currently exists and what kind of share culture the new perspectives would require. We have argued that the MO conveyed a partial translation of practices from the bottom-up, but this does not mean that the bottom-up is a homogeneous social space and that popular sectors are in bloc engaged in a romantic struggle against the logic of the capitalist economy. This is not at all the case. A common critique to social economy policies, even on the part of their supporters, is that the associated “entrepreneurs” do not see themselves as “entrepreneurs”, but relates to the socio-economic policies in the same way as with workfare plans, as strategies to obtain temporary incomes. The collective sense of socio-economic 44 The idea of the communitarian locus of social policy and the notion of civil society participation in the process of decision-making of policies is part of the common sense of targeted assistance-based policies of neoliberal regimes. In fact, international organisms emphasized the role of the Third Sector or the social capital in social policy. However, in practice, these ideas assumed the form of “delegation” rather than “participation” and of “standardization” rather than “localization”. The idea of the Third Sector, for example, is very problematic in Argentina, where there are no clear institutional boundaries between the governmental and the non-governmental sectors.

Authors: Perelmiter, Luisina.
first   previous   Page 24 of 32   next   last



background image
frameworks are not so easy to change in the short term. For example, the difficulty in
understanding the subjects of the policies in different ways (i.e. as people in situations of
poverty instead of “the poor”, as “rights holders” instead of “beneficiaries”, as
“participants” instead of “recipients”)
and, correlatively, the difficulty in imagining
alternative types of state intervention on the margins. We shall see how this cultural
limitation, embedded in the technical socialization of state actors, is intertwined with what
we will call “limits from below”. Indeed, the ways in which state actors construct the
subjects and situations of intervention is mutually determined by the ways social groups
understand their relation with the state.
b) Limits from below
The limits from below derive, first, from an inherited cultural imaginary on the relationship
with the state on the part of vulnerable social groups. This imaginary is relational and
historically constructed. I mean that perceptions about state obligations and about the types of
strategies to perform them are mutually constructed in a circular relation between state
responses and social demands. To certain extend, we could say that there is always some kind
of shared image of state between state decision-makers and the social sectors to which the
policies are addressed. Therefore, the question is what kind of shared culture currently exists
and what kind of share culture the new perspectives would require.
We have argued that the MO conveyed a partial translation of practices from the bottom-up,
but this does not mean that the bottom-up is a homogeneous social space and that popular
sectors are in bloc engaged in a romantic struggle against the logic of the capitalist economy.
This is not at all the case. A common critique to social economy policies, even on the part of
their supporters, is that the associated “entrepreneurs” do not see themselves as
“entrepreneurs”, but relates to the socio-economic policies in the same way as with workfare
plans, as strategies to obtain temporary incomes. The collective sense of socio-economic
44
The idea of the communitarian locus of social policy and the notion of civil society participation in the process
of decision-making of policies is part of the common sense of targeted assistance-based policies of neoliberal
regimes. In fact, international organisms emphasized the role of the Third Sector or the social capital in social
policy. However, in practice, these ideas assumed the form of “delegation” rather than “participation” and of
“standardization” rather than “localization”. The idea of the Third Sector, for example, is very problematic in
Argentina, where there are no clear institutional boundaries between the governmental and the non-governmental
sectors.


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 24 of 32   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.