All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

IBSA, International Relations Theories, and Changes in the Global Architecture
Unformatted Document Text:  Vikrum Sequeira 12 Midwest Conference Working Paper: IBSA changing power configurations in the international system. Alliances either help smaller powers balance against an external threat (e.g., NATO), or they help offensive powers gain leverage for war (e.g., the Axis countries). Countries can either balance or bandwagon. Siba N. Grovogui puts it well: Either by benign neglect or sheer intellectual hubris, the vast majority of Western theorists have forsaken the idea of an alternative conceptualization of foreign policy that might differ – in both substance and ethos – from that which emerged from modern Europe. This neglect may be explained by the fact that theorists have predicated the study of international relations and foreign policy on ontological foundations that uncritically assume that postcolonial states will inevitably converge with Western states in their formulations of “interest,” “value,” and “power.” Thus the prevailing models of foreign policy are derived from extrapolations on selective Western experiences and posited as immutable traditions… In contrast, the disciplinary trend [for scholars who examine the Third World] has been to presume the absence of an unified field of experiences within the postcolonial world. Here, theorists frequently emphasize the peculiarities of postcolonial entities and their divergent political trajectories in order to depreciate the attributes, values, and expectations shared by the formerly colonized. 25 If we accept that realism is problematic in describing the behaviors of non- hegemons, does liberalism or pluralism stand as a better alternative? The pluralistic view is problematic because interest group lobbying in many developing states is far less sophisticated than it is in the United States. Additionally, many poor countries do not have the permeable Congressional structure that facilitates interest group lobbying in the United States. Krasner writes: “The weakest kind of state is one that is completely permeated by pressure groups… at the other extreme… is [a state] that is able to remake 25 Siba N. Grovogui, “Postcoloniality in Global South Foreign Policy: A Perspective” in Jacqueline Anne Braveboy-Wagner (ed.), The Foreign Policies of the Global South: Rethinking Conceptual Frameworks (Boulder: Lynne-Rienner Publishers, 2003), p. 31.

Authors: Sequeira, Vikrum.
first   previous   Page 13 of 27   next   last



background image
Vikrum Sequeira
12
Midwest Conference Working Paper: IBSA
changing power configurations in the international system. Alliances either help smaller
powers balance against an external threat (e.g., NATO), or they help offensive powers
gain leverage for war (e.g., the Axis countries). Countries can either balance or
bandwagon. Siba N. Grovogui puts it well:
Either by benign neglect or sheer intellectual hubris, the vast majority of
Western
theorists
have
forsaken
the
idea
of
an
alternative
conceptualization of foreign policy that might differ – in both substance
and ethos – from that which emerged from modern Europe. This neglect
may be explained by the fact that theorists have predicated the study of
international relations and foreign policy on ontological foundations that
uncritically assume that postcolonial states will inevitably converge with
Western states in their formulations of “interest,” “value,” and “power.”
Thus the prevailing models of foreign policy are derived from
extrapolations on selective Western experiences and posited as immutable
traditions… In contrast, the disciplinary trend [for scholars who examine
the Third World] has been to presume the absence of an unified field of
experiences within the postcolonial world. Here, theorists frequently
emphasize the peculiarities of postcolonial entities and their divergent
political trajectories in order to depreciate the attributes, values, and
expectations shared by the formerly colonized.
25
If we accept that realism is problematic in describing the behaviors of non-
hegemons, does liberalism or pluralism stand as a better alternative? The pluralistic view
is problematic because interest group lobbying in many developing states is far less
sophisticated than it is in the United States. Additionally, many poor countries do not
have the permeable Congressional structure that facilitates interest group lobbying in the
United States. Krasner writes: “The weakest kind of state is one that is completely
permeated by pressure groups… at the other extreme… is [a state] that is able to remake
25
Siba N. Grovogui, “Postcoloniality in Global South Foreign Policy: A Perspective” in Jacqueline Anne
Braveboy-Wagner (ed.), The Foreign Policies of the Global South: Rethinking Conceptual Frameworks
(Boulder: Lynne-Rienner Publishers, 2003), p. 31.


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 13 of 27   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.