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A Commitment to Inaction: US Rhetoric and Darfur
Unformatted Document Text:  Andrew Buchwach Darfur, it would be difficult to argue that Lantos is obliquely referring to the ever-present plague of partisan politics. Lantos even went as far as to claim that “…when it comes to human rights and especially Darfur, there is absolutely no division between Democrat and Republic” (United States). In addition, the President was not imposing any constraints on Congress; as US Department of State employee Jedayi Frazer later explained “…the President’s goal had been for the United States to lead the way toward stability and peace in the Darfur regime” (United States). Who then was hampering the work of Congress? Once again, responsibility was placed solely in the hands of the Sudanese government. Lantos explained that: While international pressure, led by the United States, continued to mount during the past few months, the Government of Sudan opposed every possible proposal to bring stability and relief to Darfur (United States). As the perpetrator of genocide, the Sudanese government bears the heaviest burden of responsibility. However, as Lantos later proclaimed, “the international community has a moral imperative to ensure that tens of thousands of civilians don’t perish waiting for help to arrive” (emphasis added) (United States). Where does this moral imperative come from? What force should compel the US government to action? The existence of genocide. The Commission repeatedly asserted that “genocide can never be allowed to happen,” and yet stood idly by while violence ran amuck. By ignoring the prerogatives of its self-appointed “moral imperative,” this administration legitimized inaction in the face of evil. In the starkest of literal terms, only the government of Sudan can end the conflict in Darfur, in the same sense that a murderer can only “stop killing” by ending the motion 13

Authors: Buchwach, Andrew.
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Andrew Buchwach
Darfur, it would be difficult to argue that Lantos is obliquely referring to the ever-present
plague of partisan politics. Lantos even went as far as to claim that “…when it comes to
human rights and especially Darfur, there is absolutely no division between Democrat
and Republic” (United States). In addition, the President was not imposing any
constraints on Congress; as US Department of State employee Jedayi Frazer later
explained “…the President’s goal had been for the United States to lead the way toward
stability and peace in the Darfur regime” (United States). Who then was hampering the
work of Congress?
Once again, responsibility was placed solely in the hands of the Sudanese
government. Lantos explained that:
While international pressure, led by the United States,
continued to mount during the past few months, the
Government of Sudan opposed every possible proposal
to bring stability and relief to Darfur (United States).
As the perpetrator of genocide, the Sudanese government bears the heaviest burden of
responsibility. However, as Lantos later proclaimed, “the international community has a
moral imperative to ensure that tens of thousands of civilians don’t perish waiting for
help to arrive” (emphasis added) (United States). Where does this moral imperative come
from? What force should compel the US government to action? The existence of
genocide. The Commission repeatedly asserted that “genocide can never be allowed to
happen,” and yet stood idly by while violence ran amuck. By ignoring the prerogatives
of its self-appointed “moral imperative,” this administration legitimized inaction in the
face of evil.
In the starkest of literal terms, only the government of Sudan can end the conflict
in Darfur, in the same sense that a murderer can only “stop killing” by ending the motion
13


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