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Economic Interdependence and Peaceful Power Transition
Unformatted Document Text:  26 Betts, Richard K. and Thomas J. Christensen. 2000/2001. “China: Getting the Questions Right.” The National Interest, No. 62 (Winter) Boswell, Terry and Mike Sweat. 1991. "Hegemony, Long Waves, and Major Wars: A Time-Series Analysis of System Dynamics, 1496-1967." International Studies Quarterly, 35(2): 123-149. Burles, Mark and Abram N. Shulsky. 1999. Patterns in China’s Use of Force: evidence from History and Doctrinal Writings, Santa Monica, CA: Rand Corporation. Bremer, Stuart A. 1996. “Power Parity, Political Similarity, and Capability Concentration: Comparing Three Explanations of Major Power Conflict.” Cashman, Greg. 1993. What Causes War? New York: Macmillan, Inc. Christensen, Thomas. 2001. “Posing Problems without Catching up: China’s Rise and Challenges for U.S. Security Policy.” International Security, 25, pp 5-40. Copeland, Dale C. 2000. The Origins of Major War, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. DiCicco, Jonathan M. and Jack S. Levy. 1999. “Power Shifts and Program Shifts: The Evolution of the Power Transition Research Program.” Journal of conflict Resolution, Vol. 43, pp. 675-740. Diehl, Paul and Gary Goertz. 2000. War and Peace in International Rivalry. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Doran, Charles F. 2000. “Confronting the Principles of the Power Cycle: Changing Systems, Structure, Expectations, and War.” In Handbook of War Studies II, Edited by Manus I Midlarsky. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press: pp. 332-370. Efird, Brian, Jacek Kugler and Gaspare M. Genna. 2003. “From War To Intergration: Generalizing Power Transition Theory.” International Interactions, 29, pp 293-313. Finkelstein, David M. 1999. “China’s Military Strategy,” in James C. Mulvenon and Richard H. Yang, eds., The People’s Liberation Army in the Information Age, Santa Monica, CA: Rand Corporation, pp. 99-145. Funabashi, Yoichi, et. al. 1994. An Emerging China in a World of Interdependence, New York: The Trilateral Commission. Gartzke, Erik, Quan Li and Charles Boehmer. 2001. “Investing in the Peace: Economic Interdependence and International Conflict”, International Organization, Vol. 55, No. 2. (Spring 2001), pp. 391-438.

Authors: Zhou, Xinwu.
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26

Betts, Richard K. and Thomas J. Christensen. 2000/2001. “China: Getting the Questions
Right.” The National Interest, No. 62 (Winter)

Boswell, Terry and Mike Sweat. 1991. "Hegemony, Long Waves, and Major Wars: A
Time-Series Analysis of System Dynamics, 1496-1967." International Studies Quarterly,
35(2): 123-149.

Burles, Mark and Abram N. Shulsky. 1999. Patterns in China’s Use of Force: evidence
from History and Doctrinal Writings
, Santa Monica, CA: Rand Corporation.

Bremer, Stuart A. 1996. “Power Parity, Political Similarity, and Capability Concentration:
Comparing Three Explanations of Major Power Conflict.”

Cashman, Greg. 1993. What Causes War? New York: Macmillan, Inc.

Christensen, Thomas. 2001. “Posing Problems without Catching up: China’s Rise and
Challenges for U.S. Security Policy.” International Security, 25, pp 5-40.

Copeland, Dale C. 2000. The Origins of Major War, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

DiCicco, Jonathan M. and Jack S. Levy. 1999. “Power Shifts and Program Shifts: The
Evolution of the Power Transition Research Program.” Journal of conflict Resolution,
Vol. 43, pp. 675-740.

Diehl, Paul and Gary Goertz. 2000. War and Peace in International Rivalry. Ann Arbor:
University of Michigan Press.

Doran, Charles F. 2000. “Confronting the Principles of the Power Cycle: Changing
Systems, Structure, Expectations, and War.” In Handbook of War Studies II, Edited by
Manus I Midlarsky. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press: pp. 332-370.

Efird, Brian, Jacek Kugler and Gaspare M. Genna. 2003. “From War To Intergration:
Generalizing Power Transition Theory.” International Interactions, 29, pp 293-313.

Finkelstein, David M. 1999. “China’s Military Strategy,” in James C. Mulvenon and
Richard H. Yang, eds., The People’s Liberation Army in the Information Age, Santa
Monica, CA: Rand Corporation, pp. 99-145.

Funabashi, Yoichi, et. al. 1994. An Emerging China in a World of Interdependence, New
York: The Trilateral Commission.

Gartzke, Erik, Quan Li and Charles Boehmer. 2001. “Investing in the Peace: Economic
Interdependence and International Conflict”, International Organization, Vol. 55, No. 2.
(Spring 2001), pp. 391-438.


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