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Economic Interdependence and Peaceful Power Transition
Unformatted Document Text:  29 Modelski, George. 1987. Long Cycles in World Politics, Seattle: University of Washington Press. Organski, A. F. K. 1958. World Politics, New York: Alfred A, Knopf. Organski, A. F. K. and Jacek Kugler. 1980. The War Ledger, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Papayoanou, Paul. 1999. Power Ties: Economic Interdependence, Balancing, and War Ann Arbor, Michigan.: University of Michigan Press. Pillsbury, Michael. 1999. “Chinese Views of Future Warfare,” in James P. Lilley and David Shambaugh, eds.,China’s Military Faces the future, Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, pp. 64-84. Powell, Robert. 1996. “Uncertainty, Shifting Power, and Appeasement,” American Political Science Review Vol. 90, No. 4 (December): pp. 749-764. Rasler, Karen and William R. Thompson. 2000. "Global War and the Political Economy of Structural Change." In Handbook of War Studies II, Edited by Manus I Midlarsky. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press: pp. 301-331. Rapin, David, and William R. Thompson. 2003. “Power transition, Challenge and the (Re)emergence of China.” International Interactions, 29, pp. 315-342. Rock, Stephen R. 1989. Why Peace Breaks Out: Great Power Rapprochement in HistoricalPerspective, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press. Rosecrance, Richard. 1999. The Rise of the Virtual State: Wealth and Power in the Coming Century, New York: Basic Books. Ross, Robert S. 1999. “The Geography of the Peace: East Asia in the Twenty-first Century.” International Security, Vol. 23, pp. 81-118. Ruggie, John Gerard. 1993. Multilateralism Matters: The Theory and Praxis of an Institutional Form, New York: Columbia University Press. David Sanders, David. 1981. Patterns of Political Instability. New York: St Martin’s Press. Schultz, Kenneth A. 2001. Democracy and Coercive Diplomacy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Segal, Gerald. 1995. “Tying China into the International System,” Survival, vol. 37, pp. 60-73.

Authors: Zhou, Xinwu.
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29
Modelski, George. 1987. Long Cycles in World Politics, Seattle: University of
Washington Press.

Organski, A. F. K. 1958. World Politics, New York: Alfred A, Knopf.

Organski, A. F. K. and Jacek Kugler. 1980. The War Ledger, Chicago: University of
Chicago Press.

Papayoanou, Paul. 1999. Power Ties: Economic Interdependence, Balancing, and War
Ann Arbor, Michigan.: University of Michigan Press.

Pillsbury, Michael. 1999. “Chinese Views of Future Warfare,” in James P. Lilley and
David Shambaugh, eds.,China’s Military Faces the future, Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe,
pp. 64-84.

Powell, Robert. 1996. “Uncertainty, Shifting Power, and Appeasement,” American
Political Science Review
Vol. 90, No. 4 (December): pp. 749-764.

Rasler, Karen and William R. Thompson. 2000. "Global War and the Political Economy
of Structural Change." In Handbook of War Studies II, Edited by Manus I Midlarsky.
Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press: pp. 301-331.

Rapin, David, and William R. Thompson. 2003. “Power transition, Challenge and the
(Re)emergence of China.” International Interactions, 29, pp. 315-342.

Rock, Stephen R. 1989. Why Peace Breaks Out: Great Power Rapprochement in
HistoricalPerspective
, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Rosecrance, Richard. 1999. The Rise of the Virtual State: Wealth and Power in the
Coming Century
, New York: Basic Books.

Ross, Robert S. 1999. “The Geography of the Peace: East Asia in the Twenty-first
Century.” International Security, Vol. 23, pp. 81-118.

Ruggie, John Gerard. 1993. Multilateralism Matters: The Theory and Praxis of an
Institutional Form
, New York: Columbia University Press.

David Sanders, David. 1981. Patterns of Political Instability. New York: St Martin’s
Press.

Schultz, Kenneth A. 2001. Democracy and Coercive Diplomacy. Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press.

Segal, Gerald. 1995. “Tying China into the International System,” Survival, vol. 37, pp.
60-73.


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