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Hegemonic Competition, Hegemonic Disruption and the Current War
Unformatted Document Text:  Newmann: DRAFT: Please do not cite without permission Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger, sought to manage US-Soviet competition by emphasizing areas of cooperation and mutual interests along with the areas of rivalry and potential hostility. 110 The Clinton administration, taking advantage of the end of the cold war and the commensurate decrease in direct threats to the US, spoke openly about its revisionist goals. Successive National Security Strategy documents emphasize that a core objective of US national security is to “promote democracy abroad” and explicitly links free trade through the reduction in trade barriers and the spread of democracy to a reduction in the level of threat to the US. US leadership and power gives it a “responsibility” of “harnessing the forces of global integration for the benefit of our own people and people around the world.” The final Clinton National Security Strategy is the most direct: “A primary element of our strategy of engagement has been to help fashion a new international system that promotes, peace, stability, and prosperity.” 111 The Clinton administration attempted to place this new Wilsonianism into action with mixed results with humanitarian intervention in Haiti, Somalia, Bosnia, and Kosovo, new free trade agreements such as the North American Free Trade Agreement, the Free Trade Area of the Americas, and the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation forum, closer economic and political relationships with India, Russia, and China, aggressive attempts to open up markets in Japan, South Korea, and France to US exports, assistance for economies making the transition from communism, sponsorship of Middle East peace negotiations, and attempts to contain and even engage rogues states – North Korea,, Iraq, and Iran. In Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s words, Clinton foreign policy had embraced the role of the “indispensable nation.” 112 In short, the 1992); and Tony Smith, America’s Mission (Princeton: Princeton University press, 1994). 110 Alexander George, ed. Managing US-Soviet Rivalry (Boulder: Westview Press, 1983); and Robert Litwak, Detente and the Nixon Doctrine (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984). 111 The Clinton administration entered office with the mandate of developing a post-cold war foreign policy doctrine that could replace containment. Choosing “engagement” and “enlargement” the administration released successive national strategy documents as required by the Goldwater-Nichols Act. This strategy was dubbed “En-En” for short and though each document varied in its emphasis on elements of the engagement and enlargement strategy, they each linked trade, security, democracy promotion, and a US “mission” to lead the world into a new age. The above quotes are found in respectively: “A National Security Strategy of Engagement and Enlargement,” February 1995, p. i; “A National Security Strategy for a New Century,” October 1998, p. iii; “A National Security Strategy for a Global Age,” December 2000, p. 1. For analyses see Michael Mandelbaum, “Foreign Policy as Social Work,” Foreign Affairs 75, no. 1 (January/February 1996), pp. 16-??; Douglas Brinkley, “Democratic Enlargement: The Clinton Doctrine,” Foreign Policy 106 (Spring 1997): 111-127; William Hyland, Clinton’s World (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1999); and Emily O. Goldman and Larry Berman, “Engaging the World: First Impressions of the Clinton Foreign Policy Legacy,” in Colin Campbell and Bert A. Rockman, eds., The Clinton Legacy (New York: Chatham House Publishers, 2000), pp. 226-253. 112 “U.S. policy on Iraq draws fire in Ohio,” CNN, February 18, 1998. Available at http://www.cnn.com/WORLD/9802/18/town.meeting.folo/ . Accessed November 15, 2007. 39

Authors: Newmann, William.
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Newmann: DRAFT: Please do not cite without permission
Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger, sought to manage US-Soviet competition by emphasizing areas of
cooperation and mutual interests along with the areas of rivalry and potential hostility.
The Clinton administration, taking advantage of the end of the cold war and the commensurate
decrease in direct threats to the US, spoke openly about its revisionist goals. Successive National Security
Strategy documents emphasize that a core objective of US national security is to “promote democracy
abroad” and explicitly links free trade through the reduction in trade barriers and the spread of democracy to a
reduction in the level of threat to the US. US leadership and power gives it a “responsibility” of “harnessing
the forces of global integration for the benefit of our own people and people around the world.” The final
Clinton National Security Strategy is the most direct: “A primary element of our strategy of engagement has
been to help fashion a new international system that promotes, peace, stability, and prosperity.
The
Clinton administration attempted to place this new Wilsonianism into action with mixed results with
humanitarian intervention in Haiti, Somalia, Bosnia, and Kosovo, new free trade agreements such as the
North American Free Trade Agreement, the Free Trade Area of the Americas, and the Asia Pacific Economic
Cooperation forum, closer economic and political relationships with India, Russia, and China, aggressive
attempts to open up markets in Japan, South Korea, and France to US exports, assistance for economies
making the transition from communism, sponsorship of Middle East peace negotiations, and attempts to
contain and even engage rogues states – North Korea,, Iraq, and Iran. In Secretary of State Madeleine
Albright’s words, Clinton foreign policy had embraced the role of the “indispensable nation.
In short, the
1992); and Tony Smith, America’s Mission (Princeton: Princeton University press, 1994).
110
Alexander George, ed. Managing US-Soviet Rivalry (Boulder: Westview Press, 1983); and Robert Litwak, Detente and the
Nixon Doctrine (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984).
111
The Clinton administration entered office with the mandate of developing a post-cold war foreign policy doctrine that could
replace containment. Choosing “engagement” and “enlargement” the administration released successive national strategy
documents as required by the Goldwater-Nichols Act. This strategy was dubbed “En-En” for short and though each document
varied in its emphasis on elements of the engagement and enlargement strategy, they each linked trade, security, democracy
promotion, and a US “mission” to lead the world into a new age. The above quotes are found in respectively: “A National
Security Strategy of Engagement and Enlargement,” February 1995, p. i; “A National Security Strategy for a New Century,”
October 1998, p. iii; “A National Security Strategy for a Global Age,” December 2000, p. 1. For analyses see Michael
Mandelbaum, “Foreign Policy as Social Work,” Foreign Affairs 75, no. 1 (January/February 1996), pp. 16-??; Douglas Brinkley,
“Democratic Enlargement: The Clinton Doctrine,” Foreign Policy 106 (Spring 1997): 111-127; William Hyland, Clinton’s
World
(Westport, CT: Praeger, 1999); and Emily O. Goldman and Larry Berman, “Engaging the World: First Impressions of the
Clinton Foreign Policy Legacy,” in Colin Campbell and Bert A. Rockman, eds., The Clinton Legacy (New York: Chatham House
Publishers, 2000), pp. 226-253.
112
“U.S. policy on Iraq draws fire in Ohio,” CNN, February 18, 1998. Available at
. Accessed November 15, 2007.
39


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