All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Deadly Theatre: Ethnicity as a Script for Violence
Unformatted Document Text:  social slippage, the result of profound political and economic changes brought about by emancipation and the end of the Civil War. Appadurai’s framework suggests that the “real” enemy of whites was not “blacks” per se, but a color line that was threatening to dissolve completely. Disfigurement of the bodies of lynching victims righted the line and made it whole again in ways that mere murder could not. As Appadurai might argue, lynchers took the body apart to get at the “real” enemy within—the idea that white people were not all powerful after all. Simply killing the victim would not and could not have uncovered this essential “truth.” Instrumental explanations of lynching cannot account for the torture and mutilations that were common aspects of lynchings of blacks because such approaches take “black” and “white” as unproblematic givens and not as moving parts in the larger story. A performative lens, by contrast, asks how lynchers tried to construct race through lynchings and the brutal practices that made up lynchings. Through this framework, these practices cease being gory details and become instead vital clues to understanding how participants and spectators became active agents in the violence of race making. Gangbanging A very different but no less illustrative example of how people perform identities through violence is the practice of “jumping in” which Chicano gangs in Los Angeles use to initiate new gang members. James Diego Vigil calls jumping in an inverted gangbang because during a jumping in, gang members get to do to new initiates what they would normally do only to rival gang members—beat on them. New gang initiates are young, generally 12 to 13 years of age (Vigil 1996, 150). Jumping in lasts from thirty seconds to two minutes and the number of participants is usually from two to eight (Vigil 1996, 151). All who participate beat on the new initiate at the same time. The initiate must endure 18

Authors: Fujii, Lee Ann.
first   previous   Page 18 of 23   next   last



background image
social slippage, the result of profound political and economic changes brought about by
emancipation and the end of the Civil War. Appadurai’s framework suggests that the
“real” enemy of whites was not “blacks” per se, but a color line that was threatening to
dissolve completely. Disfigurement of the bodies of lynching victims righted the line and
made it whole again in ways that mere murder could not. As Appadurai might argue,
lynchers took the body apart to get at the “real” enemy within—the idea that white people
were not all powerful after all. Simply killing the victim would not and could not have
uncovered this essential “truth.”
Instrumental explanations of lynching cannot account for the torture and
mutilations that were common aspects of lynchings of blacks because such approaches
take “black” and “white” as unproblematic givens and not as moving parts in the larger
story. A performative lens, by contrast, asks how lynchers tried to construct race through
lynchings and the brutal practices that made up lynchings. Through this framework,
these practices cease being gory details and become instead vital clues to
understanding how participants and spectators became active agents in the violence of
race making.
Gangbanging
A very different but no less illustrative example of how people perform identities
through violence is the practice of “jumping in” which Chicano gangs in Los Angeles use
to initiate new gang members. James Diego Vigil calls jumping in an inverted gangbang
because during a jumping in, gang members get to do to new initiates what they would
normally do only to rival gang members—beat on them. New gang initiates are young,
generally 12 to 13 years of age (Vigil 1996, 150). Jumping in lasts from thirty seconds to
two minutes and the number of participants is usually from two to eight (Vigil 1996, 151).
All who participate beat on the new initiate at the same time. The initiate must endure
18


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 18 of 23   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.