All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Deadly Theatre: Ethnicity as a Script for Violence
Unformatted Document Text:  the beating without showing the slightest sign of fear or pain, otherwise, the gang will reject his membership (Vigil 1996, 151). Once the novitiate is successfully jumped in, the gang grants him official membership. The newly jumped in banger will then wear the scars of his ordeal proudly. The lacerations, bruises, nicks, and cuts are now emblems of his transformation from a boy to a “homeboy” (Vigil 1996, 152). Like the Peruvian practice of forcing young, army recruits to join in a gang rape or face being raped themselves, new gang members must endure violence at the hands of their peers before they can be considered official members of the gang. In both cases, new identities are only bestowed through violence. Once new initiates become bona fide gang members, their performances do not end. As Robert Garot shows, in ecologies where gangs are rife, young people (both bangers and non-bangers) use all manner of strategies to navigate their environment and to manage danger and threat. They calibrate the way they talk, dress, and walk; they strategize about the best times and routes to go to and from home. They cover up or reveal their tattoos. All these markers might or might not signal that the person is in a gang. It depends on whether people use these markers to claim gang membership or to deny it. As Garot shows through his analysis, gang membership is not a binary state. Young people are not either in or out of a gang; rather, gang identity is contextually driven. Young men make decisions about when and where to invoke their gang identity and when to deny it. As with ethnicity, these young men do not always perform identity the same way in all situations. They adjust their performances according to the exigencies of the moment. The specific practice that Garot investigates is “hitting up.” Hitting up means to say to another “where you from.” The phrase “where you from” marks the instigator as a gang member who is ready to defend his gang’s territory against rivals. Defending one’s 19

Authors: Fujii, Lee Ann.
first   previous   Page 19 of 23   next   last



background image
the beating without showing the slightest sign of fear or pain, otherwise, the gang will
reject his membership (Vigil 1996, 151). Once the novitiate is successfully jumped in, the
gang grants him official membership. The newly jumped in banger will then wear the
scars of his ordeal proudly. The lacerations, bruises, nicks, and cuts are now emblems
of his transformation from a boy to a “homeboy” (Vigil 1996, 152).
Like the Peruvian practice of forcing young, army recruits to join in a gang rape
or face being raped themselves, new gang members must endure violence at the hands
of their peers before they can be considered official members of the gang. In both cases,
new identities are only bestowed through violence.
Once new initiates become bona fide gang members, their performances do not
end. As Robert Garot shows, in ecologies where gangs are rife, young people (both
bangers and non-bangers) use all manner of strategies to navigate their environment
and to manage danger and threat. They calibrate the way they talk, dress, and walk;
they strategize about the best times and routes to go to and from home. They cover up
or reveal their tattoos. All these markers might or might not signal that the person is in a
gang. It depends on whether people use these markers to claim gang membership or to
deny it.
As Garot shows through his analysis, gang membership is not a binary state.
Young people are not either in or out of a gang; rather, gang identity is contextually
driven. Young men make decisions about when and where to invoke their gang identity
and when to deny it. As with ethnicity, these young men do not always perform identity
the same way in all situations. They adjust their performances according to the
exigencies of the moment.
The specific practice that Garot investigates is “hitting up.” Hitting up means to
say to another “where you from.” The phrase “where you from” marks the instigator as a
gang member who is ready to defend his gang’s territory against rivals. Defending one’s
19


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 19 of 23   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.