All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

I Do? Towards an (Alternative) Alternative Sexual Politics
Unformatted Document Text:  15 visibility and a politics of access, also shores up the insufficiency of “inclusion” to attend to larger questions of social justice: A liberation movement’s answer differs from the liberal politics of single-issue and gay rights that we currently espouse. A liberation movement seeks fundamental social change: we are for a just world in which racism, homophobia, sexism, economic injustice, and other systems of domination are frankly addressed and replaced with new models. (1995, 236) Vaid wants not a place at the table, but a new table altogether. 17 But that is a long laundry list of injustices, and that is precisely the problem. Fighting the multiple oppressive -isms and -phobias in the name of social justice sounds rightly coalitional, morally accurate, and politically good. But there is a line to be drawn between unquestionably reifying political fault lines and eviscerating those identitarian fault lines altogether. There is the practical question of energy and resources –we cannot fight all injustices all the time – but also some deeper theoretical problems. If politics is about people acting in concert, whether to demand the redress of grievances and/or the redistribution of goods and benefits, then it seems both morally and politically sensible that particular groups similarly situated will politick similarly, and self-interestedly. The sharing of experiences, albeit similarities of practices and beliefs or similarities in social and statutory marginalization, are not by themselves indefensible organizing principles of politics. Vaid may criticize white gay men for relegating racial and economic injustices as “not our issues,” but frankly, framed as such, they are not. (1995, 282) Put simply, “the right thing to do” argument leaves unchallenged the identitarianism that begat the problematic politics in the first place. Providing no alternative basis for political action, “the right thing to do” is additive, politically feeble as a motivating force. Calling only upon our sympathy but not cultivating our empathy, let alone our more steadfast eudaemonistic inclinations (Nussbaum 2001, 315-335), “the right thing to do” adequately inspires giving a charitable contribution; it inadequately motivates political practice. Attendant to the social justice argument is a “weak” claim to intersectionality, the claim that sexism, racism, classism and homophobia all operate simultaneously and 17 Vaid recalls that the 1990s multicultural efforts to racially diversify staff members of gay and lesbian rights organizations did little in addressing questions of race and racism. The politics of visibility, in its tokenizing gesture, supplanted serious organizational and programmatic restructuring. (1995, 298-9)

Authors: Fischel, Joseph.
first   previous   Page 16 of 35   next   last



background image
15
visibility and a politics of access, also shores up the insufficiency of “inclusion” to attend
to larger questions of social justice:
A liberation movement’s answer differs from the liberal politics of single-issue and gay
rights that we currently espouse. A liberation movement seeks fundamental social
change: we are for a just world in which racism, homophobia, sexism, economic
injustice, and other systems of domination are frankly addressed and replaced with new
models. (1995, 236)

Vaid wants not a place at the table, but a new table altogether.
17
But that is a long laundry list of injustices, and that is precisely the problem.
Fighting the multiple oppressive -isms and -phobias in the name of social justice sounds
rightly coalitional, morally accurate, and politically good. But there is a line to be drawn
between unquestionably reifying political fault lines and eviscerating those identitarian
fault lines altogether. There is the practical question of energy and resources –we cannot
fight all injustices all the time – but also some deeper theoretical problems. If politics is
about people acting in concert, whether to demand the redress of grievances and/or the
redistribution of goods and benefits, then it seems both morally and politically sensible
that particular groups similarly situated will politick similarly, and self-interestedly. The
sharing of experiences, albeit similarities of practices and beliefs or similarities in social
and statutory marginalization, are not by themselves indefensible organizing principles of
politics. Vaid may criticize white gay men for relegating racial and economic injustices
as “not our issues,” but frankly, framed as such, they are not. (1995, 282) Put simply, “the
right thing to do” argument leaves unchallenged the identitarianism that begat the
problematic politics in the first place. Providing no alternative basis for political action,
“the right thing to do” is additive, politically feeble as a motivating force. Calling only
upon our sympathy but not cultivating our empathy, let alone our more steadfast
eudaemonistic inclinations (Nussbaum 2001, 315-335), “the right thing to do” adequately
inspires giving a charitable contribution; it inadequately motivates political practice.
Attendant to the social justice argument is a “weak” claim to intersectionality, the
claim that sexism, racism, classism and homophobia all operate simultaneously and
17
Vaid recalls that the 1990s multicultural efforts to racially diversify staff members of gay and
lesbian rights organizations did little in addressing questions of race and racism. The politics of
visibility, in its tokenizing gesture, supplanted serious organizational and programmatic
restructuring. (1995, 298-9)


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 16 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.