All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

I Do? Towards an (Alternative) Alternative Sexual Politics
Unformatted Document Text:  16 interdependently to disempower. As Cohen writes, “I am interested in examining the concept of ‘queer’ … [to] construct a new political identity that is truly liberating, transformative, and inclusive of all those who stand on the outside of the dominant constructed norm of state-sanctioned white middle- and upper-class heterosexuality.” (1997, 441) She takes her cue from the well-known statement of the Combahee River Collective: “The most general statement of our politics … would be that we are actively committed to struggling against racial, sexual, heterosexual, and class oppression and see as our particular task the development of integrated analysis and practice based upon the fact that the major systems of oppression are interlocking.” (qtd. in Cohen, 1997, 441) In a brief article in The Nation, Barbara Smith too calls for a more radical, revolutionary gay politics, a politics that deprioritizes the struggles for inclusion and against discrimination, and instead embraces a 1970s-style anti-establishment liberation politics. Influenced by her own activism in that era, she writes, “I worked from the assumption that all of the ‘isms’ were connected. It was simply not possible for any oppressed people, including lesbians and gay men, to achieve freedom under this system … Nobody sane would want to be a part of the established order. It was the system— white supremacist, misogynistic, capitalist and homophobic—that had made our lives so hard to begin with.” (1993, 13) The problem with the weak supposition of intersectionality is similar to that of the social justice argument: it may be right, but it may not make effective politics. Under this analysis at least, it is also unclear how exactly these forces integrate, let alone what should compel activists to tend to this integration. Janet Halley, in her consideration of the same Combahee passage, observes that, to the contrary, different identity-based politics often have opposing goals, are often competing for the same social goods. (2006, 82-90; see also Fraser 1997a, 16-33) Moreover, cognizance of this intersectionality depends ultimately on experience. For instance, Cohen “envision[s] a politics where one’s relation to power, and not some homogenized identity, is privileged in determining one’s political comrades.” (1997, 438) Later she suggests that like feminists of color in the past, queers of color are particularly suited qua queers of color to “challenging reductive notions of heteronormativity.” (453) This subject position grants a purified epistemic vantage point: “the politics of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered people

Authors: Fischel, Joseph.
first   previous   Page 17 of 35   next   last



background image
16
interdependently to disempower. As Cohen writes, “I am interested in examining the
concept of ‘queer’ … [to] construct a new political identity that is truly liberating,
transformative, and inclusive of all those who stand on the outside of the dominant
constructed norm of state-sanctioned white middle- and upper-class heterosexuality.”
(1997, 441) She takes her cue from the well-known statement of the Combahee River
Collective: “The most general statement of our politics … would be that we are actively
committed to struggling against racial, sexual, heterosexual, and class oppression and see
as our particular task the development of integrated analysis and practice based upon the
fact that the major systems of oppression are interlocking.” (qtd. in Cohen, 1997, 441)
In a brief article in The Nation, Barbara Smith too calls for a more radical,
revolutionary gay politics, a politics that deprioritizes the struggles for inclusion and
against discrimination, and instead embraces a 1970s-style anti-establishment liberation
politics. Influenced by her own activism in that era, she writes, “I worked from the
assumption that all of the ‘isms’ were connected. It was simply not possible for any
oppressed people, including lesbians and gay men, to achieve freedom under this system
… Nobody sane would want to be a part of the established order. It was the system—
white supremacist, misogynistic, capitalist and homophobic—that had made our lives so
hard to begin with.” (1993, 13)
The problem with the weak supposition of intersectionality is similar to that of the
social justice argument: it may be right, but it may not make effective politics. Under this
analysis at least, it is also unclear how exactly these forces integrate, let alone what
should compel activists to tend to this integration. Janet Halley, in her consideration of
the same Combahee passage, observes that, to the contrary, different identity-based
politics often have opposing goals, are often competing for the same social goods. (2006,
82-90; see also Fraser 1997a, 16-33) Moreover, cognizance of this intersectionality
depends ultimately on experience. For instance, Cohen “envision[s] a politics where
one’s relation to power, and not some homogenized identity, is privileged in determining
one’s political comrades.” (1997, 438) Later she suggests that like feminists of color in
the past, queers of color are particularly suited qua queers of color to “challenging
reductive notions of heteronormativity.” (453) This subject position grants a purified
epistemic vantage point: “the politics of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered people


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 17 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.