All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Jonathan Mayhew: Conservative Revolutionary
Unformatted Document Text:  they will spend their last blood in this cause.” He insisted that he “only [mentioned] facts, without giving my own opinion,” but he then added that efforts to enforce the Act would prove inexpedient and might in fact drive to colonies “to revolt from her.” 27 Indeed, eleven days earlier Mayhew had privately asserted, “no people are under a religious obligation to be slaves, if they are able to set themselves at liberty.” 28 Thus just days before he preached his discourse on Galatians and arguably stoked the flames of resistance, Mayhew repeated his basic charge against passive obedience as a religious obligation. More, in his 19 August letter to Thomas Hollis he discussed at length the acts of violence that already had broken out in Boston, including that directed against Peter Oliver. It is in this context, with his long simmering hatred of “popery” and a growing confidence in a conspiracy aimed at colonial liberties, that his sermon on Galatians, as well as The Snare Broken, need to be read. Mayhew’s 25 August sermon does not survive. In the days immediately following the sermon, however, he produced three documents directly relating to it. A letter dated 27 August was a brief letter of sympathy to Thomas Hutchinson, the lieutenant governor whose house was destroyed the previous day and for which Mayhew’s sermon was seen as a direct incitement. In this letter Mayhew assured Hutchinson that while in his sermon he had argued “strongly in favor of civil and religious liberty, as I hope I shall ever continue to do,” he also took pains to caution “my hearers very particularly against the abuses of liberty” and that “I had rather lose my hand than be an encourager of such outrages as were committed last night.” 29 A second letter, to one of Mayhew’s parishioners, expressed regret that he had preached the sermon at that particular moment, when public emotions ran high. Reflecting on the performance, Mayhew found that he 27 Mayhew to Hollis, 19 August 1765, in “Hollis-Mayhew Correspondence,” 175. 28 Mayhew to Hollis, 8 August 1765, in “Hollis-Mayhew Correspondence,” 172. 29 Mayhew to Hutchinson, 27 August 1765, quoted in Bailyn, “Religion and Revolution,” 115. 10

Authors: Lubert, Howard.
first   previous   Page 10 of 29   next   last



background image
they will spend their last blood in this cause.” He insisted that he “only [mentioned] facts,
without giving my own opinion,” but he then added that efforts to enforce the Act would prove
inexpedient and might in fact drive to colonies “to revolt from her.”
Indeed, eleven days earlier
Mayhew had privately asserted, “no people are under a religious obligation to be slaves, if they
are able to set themselves at liberty.”
Thus just days before he preached his discourse on Galatians and arguably stoked the
flames of resistance, Mayhew repeated his basic charge against passive obedience as a religious
obligation. More, in his 19 August letter to Thomas Hollis he discussed at length the acts of
violence that already had broken out in Boston, including that directed against Peter Oliver. It is
in this context, with his long simmering hatred of “popery” and a growing confidence in a
conspiracy aimed at colonial liberties, that his sermon on Galatians, as well as The Snare Broken,
need to be read.
Mayhew’s 25 August sermon does not survive. In the days immediately following the
sermon, however, he produced three documents directly relating to it. A letter dated 27 August
was a brief letter of sympathy to Thomas Hutchinson, the lieutenant governor whose house was
destroyed the previous day and for which Mayhew’s sermon was seen as a direct incitement. In
this letter Mayhew assured Hutchinson that while in his sermon he had argued “strongly in favor
of civil and religious liberty, as I hope I shall ever continue to do,” he also took pains to caution
“my hearers very particularly against the abuses of liberty” and that “I had rather lose my hand
than be an encourager of such outrages as were committed last night.”
A second letter, to one
of Mayhew’s parishioners, expressed regret that he had preached the sermon at that particular
moment, when public emotions ran high. Reflecting on the performance, Mayhew found that he
27
Mayhew to Hollis, 19 August 1765, in “Hollis-Mayhew Correspondence,” 175.
28
Mayhew to Hollis, 8 August 1765, in “Hollis-Mayhew Correspondence,” 172.
29
Mayhew to Hutchinson, 27 August 1765, quoted in Bailyn, “Religion and Revolution,” 115.
10


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 10 of 29   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.