Citation

‘Connectedness’ and Crime: A Multi-level Examination of Neighborhood Interaction Patterns, Collective Efficacy and Violent and Property Victimization

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Abstract:

Recent research indicates that interpersonal ties among neighbors do not necessarily deter or prevent crime in urban communities and, in some circumstances, may actually predict higher crime. Studies in Chicago, Stockholm and several smaller US cities show that it is a community’s collective efficacy which more comprehensively explains the relationship between neighborhood social composition and crime levels. Collective efficacy is a task-specific construct that describes community-based mechanisms that facilitate informal social control without necessarily requiring strong ties or associations amongst community members. Using the data from a 2008 survey of approximately 4,000 participants across 160 suburbs in Brisbane, Australia, coupled with crime data provided by the Queensland Police Service and census data, we employ multi-level statistical models to test the significance of affective and instrumental neighborhood interaction in predicting collective efficacy for specific types of crime (violent, property and general delinquency) in an Australian context. We then examine this relationship further by examining their independent effect on levels of self-reported violent and property victimization across the 160 research sites.
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Association:
Name: ASC Annual Meeting
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http://www.asc41.com


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p270111_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Wickes, Rebecca. and Homel, Ross. "‘Connectedness’ and Crime: A Multi-level Examination of Neighborhood Interaction Patterns, Collective Efficacy and Violent and Property Victimization" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, St. Louis Adam's Mark, St. Louis, Missouri, <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p270111_index.html>

APA Citation:

Wickes, R. L. and Homel, R. "‘Connectedness’ and Crime: A Multi-level Examination of Neighborhood Interaction Patterns, Collective Efficacy and Violent and Property Victimization" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, St. Louis Adam's Mark, St. Louis, Missouri <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p270111_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Recent research indicates that interpersonal ties among neighbors do not necessarily deter or prevent crime in urban communities and, in some circumstances, may actually predict higher crime. Studies in Chicago, Stockholm and several smaller US cities show that it is a community’s collective efficacy which more comprehensively explains the relationship between neighborhood social composition and crime levels. Collective efficacy is a task-specific construct that describes community-based mechanisms that facilitate informal social control without necessarily requiring strong ties or associations amongst community members. Using the data from a 2008 survey of approximately 4,000 participants across 160 suburbs in Brisbane, Australia, coupled with crime data provided by the Queensland Police Service and census data, we employ multi-level statistical models to test the significance of affective and instrumental neighborhood interaction in predicting collective efficacy for specific types of crime (violent, property and general delinquency) in an Australian context. We then examine this relationship further by examining their independent effect on levels of self-reported violent and property victimization across the 160 research sites.


Similar Titles:
Unstructured Socializing, Collective Efficacy and Individual’s Violent Behavior: Integrating Individual and Structural Level Explanations of Crime.

Self-Protective Measures and Fear of Crime, Social Engagement, Collective Efficacy and Neighborhood Crime Levels

Collective Efficacy and Crime: The Relationship between Collective Efficacy, Violent Crime, Property Crime, and Drug Crime in a Southwestern City


 
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