Citation

Gender, Crime Victimization, and Fear of Crime

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Abstract:

Crime and security on college campuses have received increasingly widespread attention in light of several recent, high-profile events. Extant research on campus fear mostly addresses women, but this focus neglects a substantial number of males who may be involved, directly or indirectly, in on-campus victimization. The current study examines the relationship between victimization and fear of crime in a sample of college students, filling a gap in the literature by addressing key issues related to gender differences in fear. A sample of 1,921 female and male college students at a large southeastern university were asked about prior victimization and fear of crime. Gender differences between men and women are examined in terms of the relationship between four main types of personal victimization: stalking, sexual assault, family violence, and intimate partner violence. Subjects were also queried regarding their perceptions of the effectiveness of specific campus crime prevention strategies. Findings indicate that females are victimized by crime significantly more than males and females are more fearful of crime than males are. Furthermore, some types of crime victimization are significantly associated with fear of crime. The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of gender, fear of crime, and crime victimization.
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Association:
Name: ASC Annual Meeting
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http://www.asc41.com


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p270574_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Nobles, Matt., Fox, Kate. and Piquero, Alex. "Gender, Crime Victimization, and Fear of Crime" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, St. Louis Adam's Mark, St. Louis, Missouri, Nov 12, 2008 <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p270574_index.html>

APA Citation:

Nobles, M. R., Fox, K. and Piquero, A. , 2008-11-12 "Gender, Crime Victimization, and Fear of Crime" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, St. Louis Adam's Mark, St. Louis, Missouri <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p270574_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Crime and security on college campuses have received increasingly widespread attention in light of several recent, high-profile events. Extant research on campus fear mostly addresses women, but this focus neglects a substantial number of males who may be involved, directly or indirectly, in on-campus victimization. The current study examines the relationship between victimization and fear of crime in a sample of college students, filling a gap in the literature by addressing key issues related to gender differences in fear. A sample of 1,921 female and male college students at a large southeastern university were asked about prior victimization and fear of crime. Gender differences between men and women are examined in terms of the relationship between four main types of personal victimization: stalking, sexual assault, family violence, and intimate partner violence. Subjects were also queried regarding their perceptions of the effectiveness of specific campus crime prevention strategies. Findings indicate that females are victimized by crime significantly more than males and females are more fearful of crime than males are. Furthermore, some types of crime victimization are significantly associated with fear of crime. The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of gender, fear of crime, and crime victimization.


Similar Titles:
Predicting Student Fear of Crime: The Importance of Gender, Victimization and Migration

A Gendered Assessment of the "Threat of Victimization": Considering Fear of Crime, Perceived Risk, Avoidance and Defensive

Broken Windows in Cyberspace: Exploring the Effects of "Digital Disorder" on Computer Crime Victimization and Fear of Online Crime

Community Variations in Disorderly Behavior, Crime Victimization, and Fear of Crime: The Role of Collective Efficacy in Korea


 
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