All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Advertising and Globalization: The Transmission of Culture in Nigerian Print Advertising,
Unformatted Document Text:  Advertising and Globalization: The Transmission of Culture in Nigerian Print Advertising, Abstract: This study uses textual analysis to examine the cultural values and symbols conveyed by Nigerian consumer advertisements. Working within the framework of imperial and dependency theories, this study aims to discern whether Nigerian advertising merely promotes products or services, or seeks to exploit Nigerian social conditions. The study found that Nigerian mass media convey both negative and positive values to underscore Western rather than traditional African values and to perpetuate social division, thus undermining the pursuit of enlightened social development Introduction The past half-century has witnessed a growth in scholarship and course offerings on topics concerning cross-cultural and international communications, the aim of which is to help individuals and businesses to understand and to deal effectively with the challenges of meeting the demands of a multicultural world (Cheng 1997). “Where space and time have collapsed and the experience of distance imploded” (Sreberny-Mohammadi, 1991, p. 118). Despite this growing trend toward globalization, people continue to inhabit a world where cultural, economic, and philosophical differences persist (Giddens, 1990). Growing interest in this subject can be attributed to the ongoing debate concerning the role of mass communications, including advertising, as a means of cultural transmission and economic modernization. Twitchell (1997) contends that advertising plays a role in driving cultural evolution and has taken on the function of shared cultural memory. He goes on to argue that advertising has now become the bedrock of modern culture, replacing traditional sources of icons like painting, drama, music, and museums, even religion. In this era of globalization, breakthroughs in ICTs (information and communication technologies) have drawn nations closer together and have enabled producers of mass media artifacts rapidly to transmit their messages to a global audience. Such rapid, worldwide audience access is blamed for superimposing the values of developed nations onto developing regions because developing nations are dependent on the developed world for technical support, capital, program content, and mass media advertising systems (Schiller, 1969/1992; Sreberny- Mohammadi, 1991; Sussman 1997).

Authors: Alozie, Emmanuel.
first   previous   Page 1 of 28   next   last



background image
Advertising and Globalization: The Transmission of Culture in Nigerian Print Advertising,
Abstract:
This study uses textual analysis to examine the cultural values and symbols conveyed by Nigerian
consumer advertisements. Working within the framework of imperial and dependency theories,
this study aims to discern whether Nigerian advertising merely promotes products or services, or
seeks to exploit Nigerian social conditions. The study found that Nigerian mass media convey
both negative and positive values to underscore Western rather than traditional African values
and to perpetuate social division, thus undermining the pursuit of enlightened social development
Introduction
The past half-century has witnessed a growth in scholarship and course offerings on
topics concerning cross-cultural and international communications, the aim of which is to help
individuals and businesses to understand and to deal effectively with the challenges of meeting
the demands of a multicultural world (Cheng 1997). “Where space and time have collapsed and
the experience of distance imploded” (Sreberny-Mohammadi, 1991, p. 118). Despite this growing
trend toward globalization, people continue to inhabit a world where cultural, economic, and
philosophical differences persist (Giddens, 1990).
Growing interest in this subject can be attributed to the ongoing debate concerning the
role of mass communications, including advertising, as a means of cultural transmission and
economic modernization. Twitchell (1997) contends that advertising plays a role in driving
cultural evolution and has taken on the function of shared cultural memory. He goes on to argue
that advertising has now become the bedrock of modern culture, replacing traditional sources of
icons like painting, drama, music, and museums, even religion.
In this era of globalization, breakthroughs in ICTs (information and communication
technologies) have drawn nations closer together and have enabled producers of mass media
artifacts rapidly to transmit their messages to a global audience. Such rapid, worldwide audience
access is blamed for superimposing the values of developed nations onto developing regions
because developing nations are dependent on the developed world for technical support, capital,
program content, and mass media advertising systems (Schiller, 1969/1992; Sreberny-
Mohammadi, 1991; Sussman 1997).


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 1 of 28   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.