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Cell Phone Usage and Advertising Acceptance Among College Students: A Four-Year Analysis
Unformatted Document Text:  Cell Phone Usage and Advertising Acceptance Among College Students: A Four-Year Analysis 2007). Jupiter Research predicts a somewhat less aggressive growth rate for mobile advertising: a 50% increase to $2.9 billion by 2011 (Jupiter Research, 2006). As a reference, it took two years for broadcast TV, four years for the Internet and five years for cable TV advertising to reach $1B in ad revenue, and five years for Internet and broadcast TV advertising to reach $5B. None crossed the $10B revenue mark in their first 10 years of existence (Sharma, 2007). Mobile advertising can be targeted to the individual, personal and interactive, unlike traditional advertising that is considered to be a non-personal means of conveying a message via mass media for the purpose of informing and persuading a target audience (Ayanwale, Alimi, and Ayanbimipe, 2005). Marketers can engage consumers via mobile advertising in a number of ways. They may include a call-to-action in their traditional media advertising and encourage consumers to respond via text messaging, multimedia messaging, picture messaging, Bluetooth alerts, or voice channels on their cell phone. For instance, a consumer may be invited to send a text message, respond to a Bluetooth alert, dial a regular or toll-free number, interact with an instant voice response service, or send a picture message via the phone’s multi-media messaging service. For consumers who have previously opted in and agreed to receive mobile messages, marketers may append an advertisement to any of these messaging or voice channels, both on a broadcast basis to specific demographic groups and to individuals. Another common way to advertise on a mobile phone is through embedded on-device applications and browsers. For example, it is very common for advertisers to include inline and interstitial ads on mobile Internet sites, embed advertisements in mobile radio, video clips, TV, and games, and place an ad within a mobile operator’s dedicated portal. Ads may also be included within the interface of the phone, although this practice is not common. Mobile advertising uses both “push” and “pull” advertising strategies, often in tandem with other direct-to-consumer marketing strategies and niche market advertising strategies. Because of the inherent regulatory and telecommunications delivery barriers of advertising through the mobile channel, the presentation or delivery of mobile advertising messages has restrictions that other advertising media do not. These restrictions force marketers, in most cases, to get prior approval from consumers before being able to send commercial messages to a mobile device. With mobile marketing, receiving prior approval from a consumer before delivering a message is critical because access to mobile consumers in the United States is dictated by federal 3

Authors: Hanley, Michael. and Becker, Michael.
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Cell Phone Usage and Advertising Acceptance Among College Students: A Four-Year Analysis
2007). Jupiter Research predicts a somewhat less aggressive growth rate for mobile advertising:
a 50% increase to $2.9 billion by 2011 (Jupiter Research, 2006). As a reference, it took two years
for broadcast TV, four years for the Internet and five years for cable TV advertising to reach $1B
in ad revenue, and five years for Internet and broadcast TV advertising to reach $5B. None
crossed the $10B revenue mark in their first 10 years of existence (Sharma, 2007).
Mobile advertising can be targeted to the individual, personal and interactive, unlike
traditional advertising that is considered to be a non-personal means of conveying a message via
mass media for the purpose of informing and persuading a target audience (Ayanwale, Alimi,
and Ayanbimipe, 2005). Marketers can engage consumers via mobile advertising in a number of
ways. They may include a call-to-action in their traditional media advertising and encourage
consumers to respond via text messaging, multimedia messaging, picture messaging, Bluetooth
alerts, or voice channels on their cell phone. For instance, a consumer may be invited to send a
text message, respond to a Bluetooth alert, dial a regular or toll-free number, interact with an
instant voice response service, or send a picture message via the phone’s multi-media messaging
service. For consumers who have previously opted in and agreed to receive mobile messages,
marketers may append an advertisement to any of these messaging or voice channels, both on a
broadcast basis to specific demographic groups and to individuals. Another common way to
advertise on a mobile phone is through embedded on-device applications and browsers. For
example, it is very common for advertisers to include inline and interstitial ads on mobile
Internet sites, embed advertisements in mobile radio, video clips, TV, and games, and place an
ad within a mobile operator’s dedicated portal. Ads may also be included within the interface of
the phone, although this practice is not common.
Mobile advertising uses both “push” and “pull” advertising strategies, often in tandem
with other direct-to-consumer marketing strategies and niche market advertising strategies.
Because of the inherent regulatory and telecommunications delivery barriers of advertising
through the mobile channel, the presentation or delivery of mobile advertising messages has
restrictions that other advertising media do not. These restrictions force marketers, in most cases,
to get prior approval from consumers before being able to send commercial messages to a mobile
device. With mobile marketing, receiving prior approval from a consumer before delivering a
message is critical because access to mobile consumers in the United States is dictated by federal
3


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