Citation


Vicki Garvin: Revolutionary Leader, Organizer and Mentor

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Abstract:


A self proclaimed “pan-Africanist…working-class internationalist,” Victoria (Vicki) Holmes Garvin, makes
several appearances in recent studies of black radicalism.
Yet, these moments of inclusion provide few details of 
Garvin’s political activism beyond her work alongside 
prominent men, from Paul Robeson to Malcolm X, and her
presence during key political moments. This paper provides
a more detailed account of Garvin’s activism and radical
vision, which not only reveals the range of ideologies and
organizational forces that shaped black radicalism post-
1945, but also speaks to significant contributions of black
women as long distance runners in the Black Revolt.

Garvin grew up in Harlem in a working-class family 
struggling to survive the Great Depression. Politicized by 
these life experience and a vibrant mix of 1930s radicalism,
by the late 1940s Vicki Garvin, could be counted as a
leading labor activist with the Congress of Industrial
 Unions and a newly minted member of the Communist Party.
She would go on to serve as a National Vice President of the
National Negro Labor Council (NNLC) and a central voice in
demanding justice for black women workers. Faced with the 
constant pressure of anticommunist attacks that had led to
her ouster from the CIO and the eventual demise of the NNLC,
Garvin remained a committed radical.

In 1961 she began a decade long period of international
travel and activism during which she proved a radical voice 
among the American expatriate community in Ghana, a mentor 
to Malcolm X and a trusted comrade of Mabel and Robert 
Williams’ in China during the Cultural Revolution. Garvin
returned to the states in 1970s. She renewed her commitment
 to black revolutionary politics in the States. Garvin served 
as a key advisor in the formation of the Black United Front,
and joined the Sisters for South Africa. In these spaces
 and others, She sustained her investment in building black 
women’s leadership and radical political vision.
Convention
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Association:
Name: 93rd Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p273947_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Gore, Dayo. "
Vicki Garvin: Revolutionary Leader, Organizer and Mentor" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 93rd Annual Convention, Sheraton Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p273947_index.html>

APA Citation:

Gore, D. "
Vicki Garvin: Revolutionary Leader, Organizer and Mentor" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 93rd Annual Convention, Sheraton Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p273947_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: 
A self proclaimed “pan-Africanist…working-class internationalist,” Victoria (Vicki) Holmes Garvin, makes
several appearances in recent studies of black radicalism.
Yet, these moments of inclusion provide few details of 
Garvin’s political activism beyond her work alongside 
prominent men, from Paul Robeson to Malcolm X, and her
presence during key political moments. This paper provides
a more detailed account of Garvin’s activism and radical
vision, which not only reveals the range of ideologies and
organizational forces that shaped black radicalism post-
1945, but also speaks to significant contributions of black
women as long distance runners in the Black Revolt.

Garvin grew up in Harlem in a working-class family 
struggling to survive the Great Depression. Politicized by 
these life experience and a vibrant mix of 1930s radicalism,
by the late 1940s Vicki Garvin, could be counted as a
leading labor activist with the Congress of Industrial
 Unions and a newly minted member of the Communist Party.
She would go on to serve as a National Vice President of the
National Negro Labor Council (NNLC) and a central voice in
demanding justice for black women workers. Faced with the 
constant pressure of anticommunist attacks that had led to
her ouster from the CIO and the eventual demise of the NNLC,
Garvin remained a committed radical.

In 1961 she began a decade long period of international
travel and activism during which she proved a radical voice 
among the American expatriate community in Ghana, a mentor 
to Malcolm X and a trusted comrade of Mabel and Robert 
Williams’ in China during the Cultural Revolution. Garvin
returned to the states in 1970s. She renewed her commitment
 to black revolutionary politics in the States. Garvin served 
as a key advisor in the formation of the Black United Front,
and joined the Sisters for South Africa. In these spaces
 and others, She sustained her investment in building black 
women’s leadership and radical political vision.


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MENTORING EXPERIENCES OF LEADERS OF COLOR IN FAITH-BASED HIGHER EDUCATION: A COLLABORATIVE AUTOETHNOGRAPHY


 
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