Citation

Identity Politics and Cultural Hybridity: African Americans and African Canadians in the Black Protestant Church, 1825-1910

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Abstract:

This paper addresses issues of multiculturalism as it relates to the formation of the Black Protestant Church in America and in Canada during the mid-19th and early 20th century. During this period, the Black Protestant Church became the center of African American and African Canadian identity in places such as Michigan and Ontario. The formation of Black Protestant Churches throughout these regions revealed how African Americans, African Canadians, and Native Americans strategized sometimes corporately, and other times separately to overcome derogatory identities of “blackness”. While many within these groups chose “passing” as a way to negotiate a different identity, others deliberately chose blackness and “being black” to establish their individuality in the world. The most intriguing aspect of African American and African Canadian Protestantism in this period was the fluidity of each group’s perception of what it meant to be either black, American or Canadian. Among peoples of color living in areas around the Michigan and Ontario borders, “blackness” and “color” superseded nationality. Black church communities openly transcended territorial borders, physically and ideologically, in order to develope a collective identity that coalesced around race rather than country. This phenomenon reflected a cultural hybridity among African Americans and African Canadians in sacred spheres, and speaks to the nature of identity politics embedded with multicultural faith communities at the turn of the 20th century.

Author's Keywords:

Black Church, Identity Politics, African American, African Canadian
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Association:
Name: 93rd Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p273985_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Robinson-Harmon, Julia. "Identity Politics and Cultural Hybridity: African Americans and African Canadians in the Black Protestant Church, 1825-1910" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 93rd Annual Convention, Sheraton Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, Oct 01, 2008 <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p273985_index.html>

APA Citation:

Robinson-Harmon, J. , 2008-10-01 "Identity Politics and Cultural Hybridity: African Americans and African Canadians in the Black Protestant Church, 1825-1910" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 93rd Annual Convention, Sheraton Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p273985_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: This paper addresses issues of multiculturalism as it relates to the formation of the Black Protestant Church in America and in Canada during the mid-19th and early 20th century. During this period, the Black Protestant Church became the center of African American and African Canadian identity in places such as Michigan and Ontario. The formation of Black Protestant Churches throughout these regions revealed how African Americans, African Canadians, and Native Americans strategized sometimes corporately, and other times separately to overcome derogatory identities of “blackness”. While many within these groups chose “passing” as a way to negotiate a different identity, others deliberately chose blackness and “being black” to establish their individuality in the world. The most intriguing aspect of African American and African Canadian Protestantism in this period was the fluidity of each group’s perception of what it meant to be either black, American or Canadian. Among peoples of color living in areas around the Michigan and Ontario borders, “blackness” and “color” superseded nationality. Black church communities openly transcended territorial borders, physically and ideologically, in order to develope a collective identity that coalesced around race rather than country. This phenomenon reflected a cultural hybridity among African Americans and African Canadians in sacred spheres, and speaks to the nature of identity politics embedded with multicultural faith communities at the turn of the 20th century.


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