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Court Culture and Court Efficiency: The Study of Two Eastern Ontario Bail Courts

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Abstract:

Court efficiency is an issue worthy of scholarly attention in the field of criminology. Most obviously, the inability of a court to process cases in a timely manner can result in the termination of cases, the denial of the fundamental right to justice and the potential perception by the public that the criminal justice system is unfair (Leverick & Duff, 2002; Ashworth, 1994; Church, 1982). Within the specific context of bail court, decisions should arguably be determined quickly, as even a short period of time in custody can have devastating effects on a person’s life (Varma, 2002; Hucklesby, 1997; Rumgay, 1995). This paper intends to examine the possible relationship between court culture (the beliefs, expectations, and informal customs shared among court personnel) and court efficiency. Through a comparison of two Eastern Ontario bail courts with varying levels of court efficiency (measured by the number of bail appearances that a case requires - on average - to complete the bail process), this study explores the characteristics of both an efficient and inefficient court, comparatively and applies these characteristics to what has been found in previous research on court culture (most notably Leverick and Duff’s (2002) analysis of passive and proactive Scottish magistrate courts).
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Name: ASC Annual Meeting
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http://www.asc41.com


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p275893_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Heath, Sarah. "Court Culture and Court Efficiency: The Study of Two Eastern Ontario Bail Courts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, St. Louis Adam's Mark, St. Louis, Missouri, Nov 11, 2008 <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p275893_index.html>

APA Citation:

Heath, S. , 2008-11-11 "Court Culture and Court Efficiency: The Study of Two Eastern Ontario Bail Courts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, St. Louis Adam's Mark, St. Louis, Missouri <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p275893_index.html

Publication Type: Poster
Abstract: Court efficiency is an issue worthy of scholarly attention in the field of criminology. Most obviously, the inability of a court to process cases in a timely manner can result in the termination of cases, the denial of the fundamental right to justice and the potential perception by the public that the criminal justice system is unfair (Leverick & Duff, 2002; Ashworth, 1994; Church, 1982). Within the specific context of bail court, decisions should arguably be determined quickly, as even a short period of time in custody can have devastating effects on a person’s life (Varma, 2002; Hucklesby, 1997; Rumgay, 1995). This paper intends to examine the possible relationship between court culture (the beliefs, expectations, and informal customs shared among court personnel) and court efficiency. Through a comparison of two Eastern Ontario bail courts with varying levels of court efficiency (measured by the number of bail appearances that a case requires - on average - to complete the bail process), this study explores the characteristics of both an efficient and inefficient court, comparatively and applies these characteristics to what has been found in previous research on court culture (most notably Leverick and Duff’s (2002) analysis of passive and proactive Scottish magistrate courts).


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