Citation

Does Social Media Matter?: How perceptions of political participation on social media can facilitate political expression and foster offline political participation

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Americans’ views of political activity on social media range from exuberant to exasperated. But does the way citizens perceive social media influence their online and offline political behaviors? While the popular narrative of “Slacktivism” suggests that perceiving social media as an easy and impactful way to engage in politics only leads individuals to disengage from traditional forms of political participation, a comprehensive empirical investigation has yet to be undertaken. In the present study, we propose and test a theoretical model in which perceiving social media as context for politics encourages individuals to express themselves on social media, which in turn increases the likelihood that they will participate offline. Our results demonstrate that perceiving social media as easy or impactful can indirectly increase offline political participation, through the influence of political expression on social media. Further, we highlight that this mediated path is stronger for older individuals and less impactful for younger individuals. We also find that those with predominantly politically like-minded networks are more likely to benefit from this process. The implications for reconceptualizing the relationship between perceptions and political participation in the context of social media are discussed.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

polit (255), social (245), media (230), particip (134), express (114), offlin (88), use (79), percept (78), network (76), w1 (72), age (61), impact (60), sm (59), engag (57), effect (54), perceiv (53), homogen (52), 01 (51), individu (45), matter (41), 1 (41),
Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: AEJMC
URL:
http://www.aejmc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1282036_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Kwak, Nojin., Lane, Daniel., Weeks, Brian., Kim, Dam Hee., Lee, Slgi. and Bachleda, Sarah. "Does Social Media Matter?: How perceptions of political participation on social media can facilitate political expression and foster offline political participation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2017 <Not Available>. 2017-07-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1282036_index.html>

APA Citation:

Kwak, N. , Lane, D. , Weeks, B. , Kim, D. , Lee, S. and Bachleda, S. , 2017-08-09 "Does Social Media Matter?: How perceptions of political participation on social media can facilitate political expression and foster offline political participation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2017-07-17 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1282036_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Americans’ views of political activity on social media range from exuberant to exasperated. But does the way citizens perceive social media influence their online and offline political behaviors? While the popular narrative of “Slacktivism” suggests that perceiving social media as an easy and impactful way to engage in politics only leads individuals to disengage from traditional forms of political participation, a comprehensive empirical investigation has yet to be undertaken. In the present study, we propose and test a theoretical model in which perceiving social media as context for politics encourages individuals to express themselves on social media, which in turn increases the likelihood that they will participate offline. Our results demonstrate that perceiving social media as easy or impactful can indirectly increase offline political participation, through the influence of political expression on social media. Further, we highlight that this mediated path is stronger for older individuals and less impactful for younger individuals. We also find that those with predominantly politically like-minded networks are more likely to benefit from this process. The implications for reconceptualizing the relationship between perceptions and political participation in the context of social media are discussed.


Similar Titles:
The effect of political information reception and participation through social network sites on political values and offline political participation


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.