Citation

Juror’s Beliefs About Recanted Confessions

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Abstract:

This experiment examined jurors’ beliefs about false confessions, and how additional exculpating evidence presented changes their views about a defendant. Mock jurors read a case about a defendant accused of sexual assault who confessed to the crime but later recanted. Also included was evidence meant to exculpate the defendant (either a DNA non-match, alibi, or character statements) to determine whether any of these items would lead to more favorable views of him. Results indicate that only strong exculpating evidence (a DNA non-match) causes jurors to doubt the confession evidence and reduce their guilt judgments.
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Association:
Name: American Psychology - Law Society
URL:
http://www.ap-ls.org/


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p295637_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Anderson, Haley., McQuiston-Surrett, Dawn., Bartholomew, Mitchell. and Valenti, Richard. "Juror’s Beliefs About Recanted Confessions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, TBA, San Antonio, TX, Mar 05, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p295637_index.html>

APA Citation:

Anderson, H. , McQuiston-Surrett, D. , Bartholomew, M. and Valenti, R. , 2009-03-05 "Juror’s Beliefs About Recanted Confessions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, TBA, San Antonio, TX <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p295637_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This experiment examined jurors’ beliefs about false confessions, and how additional exculpating evidence presented changes their views about a defendant. Mock jurors read a case about a defendant accused of sexual assault who confessed to the crime but later recanted. Also included was evidence meant to exculpate the defendant (either a DNA non-match, alibi, or character statements) to determine whether any of these items would lead to more favorable views of him. Results indicate that only strong exculpating evidence (a DNA non-match) causes jurors to doubt the confession evidence and reduce their guilt judgments.


Similar Titles:
Coercion and Confessions: When do Jurors Believe Potentially Unreliable Confessions?

Can jurors spot a bad confession? An analysis of confessions and inconsistent crime details

Coercion and Confessions: When do Jurors Believe Potentially Unreliable Confessions?


 
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