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Academic vs. Professional Education: Epistmology and Journalism Educator's Academic Work

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Abstract:

This study was designed to examine journalism and mass communication educators’ personal epistemology and its influence on their academic work as educators. A case study was conducted that examined nine journalism and mass communication faculty members from varying educational and background experiences. Three separate categories were used to classify the faculty members: academic, industry, and adjunct. The results identified unique epistemologies for the faculty groups. The faculty members in the academic group commonly illustrated epistemological assumptions grounded in contextual relativism, whereas faculty members from the industry and adjunct categories more often demonstrated epistemological assumptions rooted in dualism. The different epistemological assumptions influenced faculty members’ academic work. The implications for journalism and mass communication educations are discussed.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

journal (147), academ (122), student (107), faculti (105), educ (93), profession (84), knowledg (77), member (73), work (70), research (67), epistemolog (62), industri (59), communic (58), experi (51), teach (45), group (45), report (42), mass (41), vs (36), adjunct (36), respons (34),

Author's Keywords:

epistmology, journalism, journalism educators, academic work
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Association:
Name: International Communication Association
URL:
http://www.icahdq.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p297024_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Wharton-Michael, Patty. "Academic vs. Professional Education: Epistmology and Journalism Educator's Academic Work" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 21, 2009 <Not Available>. 2017-09-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p297024_index.html>

APA Citation:

Wharton-Michael, P. J. , 2009-05-21 "Academic vs. Professional Education: Epistmology and Journalism Educator's Academic Work" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL Online <PDF>. 2017-09-11 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p297024_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study was designed to examine journalism and mass communication educators’ personal epistemology and its influence on their academic work as educators. A case study was conducted that examined nine journalism and mass communication faculty members from varying educational and background experiences. Three separate categories were used to classify the faculty members: academic, industry, and adjunct. The results identified unique epistemologies for the faculty groups. The faculty members in the academic group commonly illustrated epistemological assumptions grounded in contextual relativism, whereas faculty members from the industry and adjunct categories more often demonstrated epistemological assumptions rooted in dualism. The different epistemological assumptions influenced faculty members’ academic work. The implications for journalism and mass communication educations are discussed.


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