Citation

“Take Your Place among the Soldiers of Your Country, A Man among Men”: Military Training at Black Colleges in the Late Nineteenth Century

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Abstract:

Throughout American history, African Americans most diligently fought for the right to fight and serve in America’s armed forces. The historic connection between military service and American citizenship is well documented and provides the foundation to the African American quest for civil rights and the social movement that follows. While military service and training is linked to the fight for freedom and social equality, I argue, it also reflects how African American soldiers and proponents broaden this experience to include literacy and educational opportunities which further served to strengthen and legitimize concepts of masculine identity and manhood embedded in the legacy to bear arms and the civic virtues of education. This multidimensional pursuit of citizenship and social equality becomes intertwined in the late nineteenth century and manifests itself in the establishment of military training programs at Black Colleges and Universities.
Take Your Place among the Soldiers of Your Country, a Man among Men will examine how African American soldiers during the civil war established the link between military service and the communal pursuit of literacy in the black community as a way to empower African Americans in their claim for citizenship rights. In addition, military preparedness and training in the South challenged the docile image of the black man and reinforced a masculine self-identity embraced through military discipline and a strict code of gentlemen’s conduct. This paper will also demonstrate how Historically Black Colleges such as Hampton Institute and Tuskegee Institute established military training programs in the late nineteenth century and become models for subsequent programs as Negro Land Grant institutions were being created throughout the South.
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Association:
Name: 33rd Annual National Council for Black Studies
URL:
http://www.ncbsonline.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p297735_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Cox, Marcus. "“Take Your Place among the Soldiers of Your Country, A Man among Men”: Military Training at Black Colleges in the Late Nineteenth Century" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 33rd Annual National Council for Black Studies, Renaissance Atlanta Hotel Downtown, Atlanta, GA, Mar 19, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p297735_index.html>

APA Citation:

Cox, M. , 2009-03-19 "“Take Your Place among the Soldiers of Your Country, A Man among Men”: Military Training at Black Colleges in the Late Nineteenth Century" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 33rd Annual National Council for Black Studies, Renaissance Atlanta Hotel Downtown, Atlanta, GA <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p297735_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Throughout American history, African Americans most diligently fought for the right to fight and serve in America’s armed forces. The historic connection between military service and American citizenship is well documented and provides the foundation to the African American quest for civil rights and the social movement that follows. While military service and training is linked to the fight for freedom and social equality, I argue, it also reflects how African American soldiers and proponents broaden this experience to include literacy and educational opportunities which further served to strengthen and legitimize concepts of masculine identity and manhood embedded in the legacy to bear arms and the civic virtues of education. This multidimensional pursuit of citizenship and social equality becomes intertwined in the late nineteenth century and manifests itself in the establishment of military training programs at Black Colleges and Universities.
Take Your Place among the Soldiers of Your Country, a Man among Men will examine how African American soldiers during the civil war established the link between military service and the communal pursuit of literacy in the black community as a way to empower African Americans in their claim for citizenship rights. In addition, military preparedness and training in the South challenged the docile image of the black man and reinforced a masculine self-identity embraced through military discipline and a strict code of gentlemen’s conduct. This paper will also demonstrate how Historically Black Colleges such as Hampton Institute and Tuskegee Institute established military training programs in the late nineteenth century and become models for subsequent programs as Negro Land Grant institutions were being created throughout the South.


Similar Titles:
Toward a Pedagogical Approach in African-Centered Womanist Theory: The Relevance of the Critical Methods and Approaches of the Late Nineteenth Century Black Women Activist to Educators Today

“Take Your Place among the Soldiers of Your Country, A Man among Men”:

Lifting As We Climb: The relevance of the critical methods and approaches of the late nineteenth century Black women activists to the Black woman educator today.


 
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