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School dropout in basic education in the Philippines: Accountability and partnership

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Abstract:

Whose accountability are the school dropouts in basic education—the parents, the teachers, the school administrators, the students, the local government units, the taxpayers, the members of civil society? Generally, the parents and the dropouts themselves receive the blame from the teachers and school administrators who do not recognize the complexities of dropping out and that they themselves influence this phenomenon.

The paper presents a slice of a national study on school dropout that utilized qualitative research methods (focus group/individual interview and case study) in collecting data from school division administrators, school heads/principals, teachers of dropouts, parents of dropouts, dropouts themselves and other students.

The study found out that poverty influenced the double-digit dropout rates in the elementary and secondary schools involved in the study. The report also showed that gender (male/female) and location (urban/rural) influenced dropping out. As a complex phenomenon with psychological, cultural and sociological dimensions, the study argues that school dropout should be addressed by using a multi-sectoral approach where various stakeholders serve as major partners—the family, school, department of education, local government units, members of civil society, local community, NGOs and other national agencies. Practical solutions to dropping out are suggested.

Author's Keywords:

School Dropout
Convention
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Association:
Name: 53rd Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
URL:
http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p297855_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Abuso, Julian. "School dropout in basic education in the Philippines: Accountability and partnership" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 53rd Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Francis Marion Hotel, Charleston, South Carolina, Mar 21, 2009 <Not Available>. 2013-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p297855_index.html>

APA Citation:

Abuso, J. E. , 2009-03-21 "School dropout in basic education in the Philippines: Accountability and partnership" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 53rd Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Francis Marion Hotel, Charleston, South Carolina <Not Available>. 2013-12-13 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p297855_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Whose accountability are the school dropouts in basic education—the parents, the teachers, the school administrators, the students, the local government units, the taxpayers, the members of civil society? Generally, the parents and the dropouts themselves receive the blame from the teachers and school administrators who do not recognize the complexities of dropping out and that they themselves influence this phenomenon.

The paper presents a slice of a national study on school dropout that utilized qualitative research methods (focus group/individual interview and case study) in collecting data from school division administrators, school heads/principals, teachers of dropouts, parents of dropouts, dropouts themselves and other students.

The study found out that poverty influenced the double-digit dropout rates in the elementary and secondary schools involved in the study. The report also showed that gender (male/female) and location (urban/rural) influenced dropping out. As a complex phenomenon with psychological, cultural and sociological dimensions, the study argues that school dropout should be addressed by using a multi-sectoral approach where various stakeholders serve as major partners—the family, school, department of education, local government units, members of civil society, local community, NGOs and other national agencies. Practical solutions to dropping out are suggested.

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