Citation

EyeTracking the News: The Report of EyeTrack 07A Study of Print and Online Reading

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Abstract:

How much do readers read – in both the printed and the online version of a newspaper?
This paper explores the answer to that question by reporting the results of a study conducted by The Poynter Institute for Media Studies in 2006 in which 600 readers (200 reading broadsheet newspapers, 200 reading tabloid newspapers, 200 reading newspapers online) were studied using the latest technology in eye tracking equipment to determine how much they read and to examine their behavior in how they navigated through information in newspaper and in news online. Readers read the newspaper or news website for 15 minutes while the eye tracking equipment measured what they read, how much they read, what they looked at first, second and third on each page or screen, and how many elements they observed. With almost 300 variables measured, the data provided a rich foundation to study similarities and differences between reading and navigating through information in print and online.
The study reveals what elements attracted the most visual attention or eye stops. Among the variables studied: Headlines, photographs, informational graphics, lead stories, centerpiece stories, regular news stories, briefs, columnists, fact boxes, alternative story forms and much more. Stories in print and online were measured so that a precise count of how much text was read could be calculated. All results were compared to determine similarities and differences between print and online reading. The most important finding in this study was that readers read more story text online than in print. This paper reports the details of the findings of the entire study.
All 600 readers who were tested in the eye tracking study participated in comprehension/prototype part of the study. After they were eye tracked reading the real newspaper in print or online, they were asked to read one of the comprehension prototypes. Each reader read the prototype for five minutes and then took a five-minute test that contained factual questions about the stories. The results showed that alternative story forms and display worked better to help people remember facts about a story.
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Association:
Name: International Communication Association
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http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p298658_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Stanton, David. "EyeTracking the News: The Report of EyeTrack 07A Study of Print and Online Reading" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2017-09-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p298658_index.html>

APA Citation:

Stanton, D. D. "EyeTracking the News: The Report of EyeTrack 07A Study of Print and Online Reading" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL <Not Available>. 2017-09-11 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p298658_index.html

Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: How much do readers read – in both the printed and the online version of a newspaper?
This paper explores the answer to that question by reporting the results of a study conducted by The Poynter Institute for Media Studies in 2006 in which 600 readers (200 reading broadsheet newspapers, 200 reading tabloid newspapers, 200 reading newspapers online) were studied using the latest technology in eye tracking equipment to determine how much they read and to examine their behavior in how they navigated through information in newspaper and in news online. Readers read the newspaper or news website for 15 minutes while the eye tracking equipment measured what they read, how much they read, what they looked at first, second and third on each page or screen, and how many elements they observed. With almost 300 variables measured, the data provided a rich foundation to study similarities and differences between reading and navigating through information in print and online.
The study reveals what elements attracted the most visual attention or eye stops. Among the variables studied: Headlines, photographs, informational graphics, lead stories, centerpiece stories, regular news stories, briefs, columnists, fact boxes, alternative story forms and much more. Stories in print and online were measured so that a precise count of how much text was read could be calculated. All results were compared to determine similarities and differences between print and online reading. The most important finding in this study was that readers read more story text online than in print. This paper reports the details of the findings of the entire study.
All 600 readers who were tested in the eye tracking study participated in comprehension/prototype part of the study. After they were eye tracked reading the real newspaper in print or online, they were asked to read one of the comprehension prototypes. Each reader read the prototype for five minutes and then took a five-minute test that contained factual questions about the stories. The results showed that alternative story forms and display worked better to help people remember facts about a story.


Similar Titles:
Testing News Trustworthiness in Online Public Sphere: A Case Study of The Economist’s News Report Covering Riots in Xinjiang, China


 
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