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Cultivation Theory Revisited: The Impact of Childhood Television Viewing Levels on Social Reality Beliefs and Construct Accessibility in Adulthood

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Abstract:

The present study explores the relationship between television viewing levels during childhood and social reality beliefs in adulthood. Theory and research into the organization, storage, and retrieval of long-term memory are used to develop a scale for measuring past and present exposure to violent television. In a survey of 207 young adults, cultivation theory is tested using childhood exposure to violent television fiction and violent television news as predictor variables. The accessibility of violent constructs in memory and social reality beliefs are the primary dependent variables. Findings reveal an unexpected negative relationship between exposure to the news during elementary school and high school and social reality beliefs in young adulthood. Furthermore, there is a negative relationship between television news exposure during elementary school and the accessibility of violent constructs in young adulthood. Childhood exposure to fictional violence was not related to accessibility or social reality beliefs. Theoretical explanations for the findings and directions for future research are discussed.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

televis (152), exposur (84), view (82), childhood (76), news (63), social (59), violent (55), particip (47), realiti (46), studi (45), research (43), belief (42), cultiv (39), measur (37), time (36), access (36), memori (35), use (35), p (34), school (32), present (31),

Author's Keywords:

media violence, cultivation theory, television news
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Name: International Communication Association
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http://www.icahdq.org


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MLA Citation:

Riddle, Karyn. "Cultivation Theory Revisited: The Impact of Childhood Television Viewing Levels on Social Reality Beliefs and Construct Accessibility in Adulthood" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 21, 2009 <Not Available>. 2017-09-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p299457_index.html>

APA Citation:

Riddle, K. E. , 2009-05-21 "Cultivation Theory Revisited: The Impact of Childhood Television Viewing Levels on Social Reality Beliefs and Construct Accessibility in Adulthood" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL Online <PDF>. 2017-09-11 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p299457_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The present study explores the relationship between television viewing levels during childhood and social reality beliefs in adulthood. Theory and research into the organization, storage, and retrieval of long-term memory are used to develop a scale for measuring past and present exposure to violent television. In a survey of 207 young adults, cultivation theory is tested using childhood exposure to violent television fiction and violent television news as predictor variables. The accessibility of violent constructs in memory and social reality beliefs are the primary dependent variables. Findings reveal an unexpected negative relationship between exposure to the news during elementary school and high school and social reality beliefs in young adulthood. Furthermore, there is a negative relationship between television news exposure during elementary school and the accessibility of violent constructs in young adulthood. Childhood exposure to fictional violence was not related to accessibility or social reality beliefs. Theoretical explanations for the findings and directions for future research are discussed.


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