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YouTube and Media Literacy: Testing the Effectiveness of YouTube Media Literacy Campaigns About Body Image Targeted Toward Adolescent Girls and College Women

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Abstract:

Research examining the social effects of mass media as it relates to body image distortion often considers some behavioral components, specifically excessive dieting, bingeing, and exercising, but little is known about the degree in which more positive media messages, specifically campaigns designed to promote positive attitudes and beliefs about body shape and size will effect the self and others. Using an experiment to test the effectiveness of four different media literacy campaigns on YouTube, this study tested the effectiveness of four stylistically different media literacy campaigns about body image and tested the possible factors that might increase or decrease the perceived effectiveness of each. Respondents in this study reported that the media literacy campaign about a celebrity’s struggle with extreme thinness proved to be the least effective of the four whereas the video presenting general information about the dangers of extreme dieting was perceived to be the most effective, at least for this sample. Self-discrepancy did not prove to be a significant predictor of perceived effectiveness of the campaign, and the amount of time spent on the Internet also proved to be a weak predictor of perceived effectiveness. These findings and the possible rationale for the lack of support with regard to the correlates of perceived effectiveness are discussed.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

media (159), effect (124), campaign (97), self (81), eat (79), literaci (79), bodi (78), disord (74), imag (65), perceiv (61), discrep (54), video (54), youtub (53), relat (53), use (49), inform (48), women (46), self-discrep (45), internet (43), particip (38), differ (37),

Author's Keywords:

media literacy, body image, YouTube, self-discrepancy, ad effectiveness
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MLA Citation:

Meng, Juan. and Bissell, Kimberly. "YouTube and Media Literacy: Testing the Effectiveness of YouTube Media Literacy Campaigns About Body Image Targeted Toward Adolescent Girls and College Women" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 20, 2009 <Not Available>. 2017-09-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p299681_index.html>

APA Citation:

Meng, J. and Bissell, K. , 2009-05-20 "YouTube and Media Literacy: Testing the Effectiveness of YouTube Media Literacy Campaigns About Body Image Targeted Toward Adolescent Girls and College Women" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2017-09-11 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p299681_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research examining the social effects of mass media as it relates to body image distortion often considers some behavioral components, specifically excessive dieting, bingeing, and exercising, but little is known about the degree in which more positive media messages, specifically campaigns designed to promote positive attitudes and beliefs about body shape and size will effect the self and others. Using an experiment to test the effectiveness of four different media literacy campaigns on YouTube, this study tested the effectiveness of four stylistically different media literacy campaigns about body image and tested the possible factors that might increase or decrease the perceived effectiveness of each. Respondents in this study reported that the media literacy campaign about a celebrity’s struggle with extreme thinness proved to be the least effective of the four whereas the video presenting general information about the dangers of extreme dieting was perceived to be the most effective, at least for this sample. Self-discrepancy did not prove to be a significant predictor of perceived effectiveness of the campaign, and the amount of time spent on the Internet also proved to be a weak predictor of perceived effectiveness. These findings and the possible rationale for the lack of support with regard to the correlates of perceived effectiveness are discussed.


Similar Titles:
An Individual Difference Approach to Understanding Communication Campaign Effects: Self-Monitoring, Perceived Message Effectiveness, and Perceived Media Influence

The (Mis)perceivers: Gender Differences in Self-Other Body Image Discrepancies and Body Dissatisfaction Among Chinese Emerging Adults

Reaching the techno-savvy viewers: Third-person perception about the effectiveness of YouTube as a media literacy tool about body image


 
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