Citation

Mobilizing Disaster Relief: U.S. Media Coverage and Public Response to the Tsunami and Pakistan Earthquake

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

The South Asian tsunami and Pakistan earthquake devastated multiple nations in 2004 and 2005. In the wake of these disasters, people turned to the media to find out what happened and how they could help, contributing $1.8 billion to tsunami relief efforts, compared to $129 million following the Pakistan earthquake. Through content analysis of New York Times, CNN and "NBC Nightly News" coverage, this paper examines media-provided mobilizing information (MI), which may have enabled disaster relief. Findings indicate that Pakistan earthquake coverage provided more MI overall, yet tsunami coverage provided more explicit MI. The most basic MI, defined for this study as "need-level MI," was most prevalent, and Web addresses were the most common type of "location-level MI." CNN coverage provided the most MI overall. Finally, nonprofit and government officials were the most common sources of MI in news coverage. Implications for media and disaster relief officials are discussed.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

tt (2), sunami coverage (1), orrelat (1), und (1), roportionatel (1), ive (1), onsiderin (1), agnitude, deat (1), ircumstance (1), aise (1), xplained (1), nformation o (1), r contac (1), nd a (1), ll (1), esul (1), tudy. Afte (1), tories (1), urprisin (1), 36% governmen (1), ources) (1),

Author's Keywords:

content analysis, disaster relief, mobilizing information
Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: International Communication Association
URL:
http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p300990_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Weberling, Brooke. "Mobilizing Disaster Relief: U.S. Media Coverage and Public Response to the Tsunami and Pakistan Earthquake" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 20, 2009 <Not Available>. 2017-09-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p300990_index.html>

APA Citation:

Weberling, B. , 2009-05-20 "Mobilizing Disaster Relief: U.S. Media Coverage and Public Response to the Tsunami and Pakistan Earthquake" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2017-09-11 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p300990_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The South Asian tsunami and Pakistan earthquake devastated multiple nations in 2004 and 2005. In the wake of these disasters, people turned to the media to find out what happened and how they could help, contributing $1.8 billion to tsunami relief efforts, compared to $129 million following the Pakistan earthquake. Through content analysis of New York Times, CNN and "NBC Nightly News" coverage, this paper examines media-provided mobilizing information (MI), which may have enabled disaster relief. Findings indicate that Pakistan earthquake coverage provided more MI overall, yet tsunami coverage provided more explicit MI. The most basic MI, defined for this study as "need-level MI," was most prevalent, and Web addresses were the most common type of "location-level MI." CNN coverage provided the most MI overall. Finally, nonprofit and government officials were the most common sources of MI in news coverage. Implications for media and disaster relief officials are discussed.


Similar Titles:
L'historiographie régienne face aux guerres de religion françaises

Voice and voiceless-ness in her(s)tory and his(s)tory: A Post-Colonial/Feminist reading of the representation of the black female voice in Afro-Hispanic literary narratives.

Une Exception Française ? The Politicization of IR Professors Recruitment in France


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.