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Race of Interviewer Effects and Barack Obama: Data from the 2008 General Election Campaign
Unformatted Document Text:  8 Data and Research Design Considering that other research on racial framing raises concerns about external validity, we use question-wording experiments embedded in a public opinion interview to assess the role of racial framing and social desirability on a real political figure. The Institute for Public Policy & Social Research at Michigan State University conducted the survey over a two-month period in the summer of 2007. The survey was designed specifically to study racial attitudes, and was conducted by telephone using a stratified random sample of English-speaking adults age eighteen and older. The sample was stratified by region of the state. In addition, there was an over-sample of telephone exchanges in which at least 20 percent of the population was black. Post-sampling weights adjust for the regional stratification, the over-sample of certain telephone exchanges, and unequal probabilities of selection in the household. Interviews were completed with 746 persons, of whom 147 were self-identified as black or African American, 746 as white, and 65 as “other.” The completion rate among eligible households was 60.2 percent. Because of the smaller sample size of African American respondents across the experimental design, some of our analyses are based primarily on respondents who were self-identified as white. The approximately 20-minute survey was conducted using Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI). Because the experimental techniques employed in this survey are simple functions of computer programming, respondents were unaware of any manipulation in the interview schedule and questions. Racial Framing In the context of deracialized campaign, There are several subtle and not-so subtle ways black candidates can be made to appear more “black,” Afro-centric, nationalistic, racially conscious, and as a result, more nefarious and threatening to whites’ self and group interests. Racialized black candidates are likely to appear pernicious because they are perceived to favor blacks’ interests over

Authors: Wilson, David.
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Data and Research Design 
 
Considering that other research on racial framing raises concerns about external validity, we 
use question-wording experiments embedded in a public opinion interview to assess the role of 
racial framing and social desirability on a real political figure. The Institute for Public Policy & Social 
Research at Michigan State University conducted the survey over a two-month period in the summer 
of 2007.  The survey was designed specifically to study racial attitudes, and was conducted by 
telephone using a stratified random sample of English-speaking adults age eighteen and older.  The 
sample was stratified by region of the state.  In addition, there was an over-sample of telephone 
exchanges in which at least 20 percent of the population was black.  Post-sampling weights adjust 
for the regional stratification, the over-sample of certain telephone exchanges, and unequal 
probabilities of selection in the household. Interviews were completed with 746 persons, of whom 
147 were self-identified as black or African American, 746 as white, and 65 as “other.” The 
completion rate among eligible households was 60.2 percent.  Because of the smaller sample size of 
African American respondents across the experimental design, some of our analyses are based 
primarily on respondents who were self-identified as white. The approximately 20-minute survey 
was conducted using Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI). Because the experimental 
techniques employed in this survey are simple functions of computer programming, respondents 
were unaware of any manipulation in the interview schedule and questions. 
 
Racial Framing 
In the context of deracialized campaign, There are several subtle and not-so subtle ways 
black candidates can be made to appear more “black,” Afro-centric, nationalistic, racially conscious, 
and as a result, more nefarious and threatening to whites’ self and group interests. Racialized black 
candidates are likely to appear pernicious because they are perceived to favor blacks’ interests over 


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