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American for-profit institutions and China’s Minban higher education since late 1970s: A comparative perspective

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Abstract:

Like the for-profit institutions in the U. S., China’s Minban (people-run) colleges and universities, a new sector in China’s higher learning, has been thriving and gaining an increasingly larger market share since the implementation of China’s reform and open door policy in 1978. Statistics showed that, by the end of 2007, the overall number of Minban institutions had reached 1521, with 605 acredited degree-granting institutions enrolling 3,496,900 students. However, relevant research concerning the rise and growth of this new sector, and the political environment for development is very limited, either because of the weak research competence of its own, or the insufficient research fund support from the central and local government. Only recently have some scholars begun to turn their attention to its study, but their perspective remains mainly regional rather than international. The current research, however, examines the similarities and differences between American for-profit institutions and China’s Minban higher education since late 1970s in regards to the emergence, development, problems, and prospect of this sector in the years to come. By having comparative analysis, this study seeks to provide significant and practical implication for China’s policy making concerning Minban higher education.

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American For-Profit Institutions, China’s Minban Higher Education
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Association:
Name: 53rd Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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MLA Citation:

Xiao, Shanxiang. "American for-profit institutions and China’s Minban higher education since late 1970s: A comparative perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 53rd Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Francis Marion Hotel, Charleston, South Carolina, Mar 22, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p302264_index.html>

APA Citation:

Xiao, S. , 2009-03-22 "American for-profit institutions and China’s Minban higher education since late 1970s: A comparative perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 53rd Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Francis Marion Hotel, Charleston, South Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p302264_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Like the for-profit institutions in the U. S., China’s Minban (people-run) colleges and universities, a new sector in China’s higher learning, has been thriving and gaining an increasingly larger market share since the implementation of China’s reform and open door policy in 1978. Statistics showed that, by the end of 2007, the overall number of Minban institutions had reached 1521, with 605 acredited degree-granting institutions enrolling 3,496,900 students. However, relevant research concerning the rise and growth of this new sector, and the political environment for development is very limited, either because of the weak research competence of its own, or the insufficient research fund support from the central and local government. Only recently have some scholars begun to turn their attention to its study, but their perspective remains mainly regional rather than international. The current research, however, examines the similarities and differences between American for-profit institutions and China’s Minban higher education since late 1970s in regards to the emergence, development, problems, and prospect of this sector in the years to come. By having comparative analysis, this study seeks to provide significant and practical implication for China’s policy making concerning Minban higher education.


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