Citation

Countering the Counter Discursive in Hip-Hop Culture

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Abstract:

While many may view hip hop as a counter discursive measure, more often than not, popular representations of hip-hop culture reify notions of white supremacy. There may have been a moment when the major currency in hip-hop was its anti-establishment—social and political relevancy built upon the radical activism of the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements—when artists such as Afrika Bambaata, KRS-One, and Chuck-D advocated counter-hegemonic frameworks with dexterity for newer generations. Hip hop culture, however, in many ways has become truncated and immersed in the normalized rhetoric of American society. Contemporarily, American hip hop culture largely is a manifestation of neo-colonialism in a Fanonian perspective where the oppressed have become the oppressors. This research seeks to continue the dialogue regarding inconsistencies of “revolutionary consciousness” in hip hop when concerns of sexism, heterosexism, social and economic elitism and racial supremacy arise. Often productions and consumption of hip hop reveal consciousnesses in producers and consumers alike that are conterminous with the dominant culture despite a proverbial sense of denial. This essay will address the following primary question: How can and/or do hip hop artists speak against the structure of white supremacy while representing the structure and still be accountable to both community and their labor system?
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Association:
Name: 33rd Annual National Council for Black Studies
URL:
http://www.ncbsonline.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p302508_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Spaulding, Stephany. "Countering the Counter Discursive in Hip-Hop Culture" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 33rd Annual National Council for Black Studies, Renaissance Atlanta Hotel Downtown, Atlanta, GA, <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p302508_index.html>

APA Citation:

Spaulding, S. R. "Countering the Counter Discursive in Hip-Hop Culture" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 33rd Annual National Council for Black Studies, Renaissance Atlanta Hotel Downtown, Atlanta, GA <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p302508_index.html

Publication Type: Panelist Abstract
Abstract: While many may view hip hop as a counter discursive measure, more often than not, popular representations of hip-hop culture reify notions of white supremacy. There may have been a moment when the major currency in hip-hop was its anti-establishment—social and political relevancy built upon the radical activism of the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements—when artists such as Afrika Bambaata, KRS-One, and Chuck-D advocated counter-hegemonic frameworks with dexterity for newer generations. Hip hop culture, however, in many ways has become truncated and immersed in the normalized rhetoric of American society. Contemporarily, American hip hop culture largely is a manifestation of neo-colonialism in a Fanonian perspective where the oppressed have become the oppressors. This research seeks to continue the dialogue regarding inconsistencies of “revolutionary consciousness” in hip hop when concerns of sexism, heterosexism, social and economic elitism and racial supremacy arise. Often productions and consumption of hip hop reveal consciousnesses in producers and consumers alike that are conterminous with the dominant culture despite a proverbial sense of denial. This essay will address the following primary question: How can and/or do hip hop artists speak against the structure of white supremacy while representing the structure and still be accountable to both community and their labor system?


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Black Thoughts, Black Activism: The Cuban Underground Hip Hop Movement and Afro-Latino Counter-Cultures of Modernity

Liberation Hip Hop: Palestinian Hip Hop and the Culture of Resistance


 
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