Citation

Acquiring the dominant lexicon: A comparison of language instruction policies for language minorities in different countries

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Abstract:

This paper explores language instruction programs in various international contexts that are designed to teach the dominant lexicon to language minority students. Despite the fact that many countries see an influx of immigrant students or have multiple minority ethno-linguistic groups within their own borders, nations have divergent goals, processes and means by which they teach language minority students the dominant language. The purpose of this paper is to deepen our understanding of the motivations behind and the consequences of such programs.
This comparative paper addresses how language instruction programs are related to social and cultural capital, economic status and opportunity as well as social cohesion. The consideration of these various factors helps to clarify the multi-layered impact of language instruction and provides additional insight in answering the following questions: Why do some countries encourage students to maintain their native language while others promote transition and assimilation into the dominant language group? What role does government centralization play in language policies? Are language policies inextricably linked to other policy issues? This discussion seeks to highlight some of the repercussions of various types of instruction for language minorities.
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Association:
Name: 53rd Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p302966_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Mavrogordato, Madeline. "Acquiring the dominant lexicon: A comparison of language instruction policies for language minorities in different countries" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 53rd Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Francis Marion Hotel, Charleston, South Carolina, Mar 21, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p302966_index.html>

APA Citation:

Mavrogordato, M. C. , 2009-03-21 "Acquiring the dominant lexicon: A comparison of language instruction policies for language minorities in different countries" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 53rd Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Francis Marion Hotel, Charleston, South Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p302966_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores language instruction programs in various international contexts that are designed to teach the dominant lexicon to language minority students. Despite the fact that many countries see an influx of immigrant students or have multiple minority ethno-linguistic groups within their own borders, nations have divergent goals, processes and means by which they teach language minority students the dominant language. The purpose of this paper is to deepen our understanding of the motivations behind and the consequences of such programs.
This comparative paper addresses how language instruction programs are related to social and cultural capital, economic status and opportunity as well as social cohesion. The consideration of these various factors helps to clarify the multi-layered impact of language instruction and provides additional insight in answering the following questions: Why do some countries encourage students to maintain their native language while others promote transition and assimilation into the dominant language group? What role does government centralization play in language policies? Are language policies inextricably linked to other policy issues? This discussion seeks to highlight some of the repercussions of various types of instruction for language minorities.


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