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Transnational Family Law and Parental Power Relations in Dutch-Moroccan and Dutch-Egyptian Families

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Abstract:

This paper discusses how family law regulations in the Netherlands, Egypt and Morocco and their interaction might affect power relations between parents in Dutch-Moroccan and Dutch-Egyptian families. Family law gives regulations on for instance children’s first and family names, parental authority, and nationality. In the transnational context rules of private international law open up ways of affecting outcomes of family law regulations, for instance by choice of law or forum. The paper’s main focus is on how these regulations affect parents’ relative power in forming the legal relation with their children. In what ways do family law regulations of the three countries and the interaction between these afford a specific power position to both parents? Are these power positions related to gender, or ethnicity? Have recent law reforms in these three countries affected these positions? How does knowledge of these (changed) regulations affects their outcome?

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power (138), law (108), famili (86), parent (79), komter (53), ideolog (36), way (31), relat (30), structur (28), child (27), view (25), invis (25), children (24), one (24), ewick (23), make (23), silbey (23), moroccan (23), author (23), hegemoni (22), might (21),
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MLA Citation:

Kulk, Friso. "Transnational Family Law and Parental Power Relations in Dutch-Moroccan and Dutch-Egyptian Families" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Grand Hyatt, Denver, Colorado, May 25, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p303669_index.html>

APA Citation:

Kulk, F. , 2009-05-25 "Transnational Family Law and Parental Power Relations in Dutch-Moroccan and Dutch-Egyptian Families" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Grand Hyatt, Denver, Colorado Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-29 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p303669_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper discusses how family law regulations in the Netherlands, Egypt and Morocco and their interaction might affect power relations between parents in Dutch-Moroccan and Dutch-Egyptian families. Family law gives regulations on for instance children’s first and family names, parental authority, and nationality. In the transnational context rules of private international law open up ways of affecting outcomes of family law regulations, for instance by choice of law or forum. The paper’s main focus is on how these regulations affect parents’ relative power in forming the legal relation with their children. In what ways do family law regulations of the three countries and the interaction between these afford a specific power position to both parents? Are these power positions related to gender, or ethnicity? Have recent law reforms in these three countries affected these positions? How does knowledge of these (changed) regulations affects their outcome?


Similar Titles:
Parents and Children across Borders: Legal Instability and Intergenerational Relations in Guatemalan and Salvadoran Families.

Legal Consciousness in Juvenile Delinquency Court: How Parents and Children Develop Views of Law and Justice through Court Experiences and Family Interaction


 
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