All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

A House Is Not a Home: Lessons on Race, Love, and Housing in Rhinelander v. Rhinelander
Unformatted Document Text:  \\server05\productn\H\HLC\44-1\HLC108.txt unknown Seq: 16 29-JAN-09 8:05 246 Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review [Vol. 44 did not involve a claim of discrimination based on interraciality, we didconfront the question of how interraciality would fit into our factual allega-tions, ultimately deciding to move forward with a more traditional and “rec-ognizable” claim based on race. In this Article, we use a hypothetical inorder to highlight the question of discrimination and interraciality and em-phasize the difficulties that interracial, heterosexual couples can face in hav-ing their claims fully embraced and acknowledged by the law. Hypothetical Consider, for example, the hypothetical case of a married couple —An- drew Williams, a black man, and Jackie Owens, a white woman. 58 Andrew and Jackie live in a large city on the East Coast, where Andrew works as adoctor at a prominent hospital and Jackie works as a high school teacher.Two years earlier, they had relocated from a large Midwestern city, wherethey lived in a suburban house they owned jointly. Upon moving, they soldtheir house and rented an apartment in the bustling city-center, close to An-drew’s new hospital. They enjoyed the experience of living in the city, butwanted to move to a quieter, more residential area. Because they planned towait a few more years before purchasing their own house, they looked foranother apartment or house to rent in a nearby suburb. Andrew and Jackie found an advertisement for a two-bedroom apart- ment on a website with local rental listings. They called the landlord/ownerto set up an appointment to view the apartment. Although the landlord couldnot meet them personally, he arranged a time for a rental agent to showAndrew and Jackie the apartment. When Andrew and Jackie arrived for their appointment, they found the house attractive and well-maintained, and they appreciated its location on aquiet tree-lined street. While Andrew checked out the lawn, Jackie rang thedoorbell and was greeted warmly with a handshake by the rental agent,Betty, who was white. When Andrew walked up behind Jackie and intro-duced himself as Jackie’s husband, Betty’s demeanor seemed to change.Betty greeted Andrew only verbally and quickly turned her back to begin thetour of the apartment. Both Andrew and Jackie noted Betty’s odd behaviorbut quickly put it out of their minds as they toured the apartment. As they viewed the apartment, Andrew and Jackie fell in love with it. Immediately after finishing the tour, Andrew called the landlord from the carto express their desire to rent the property. The landlord seemed very happythat they were interested, and he explained that he already had other applica-tions for the apartment, but had not yet made a decision. He instructed themto leave their application with the rental agent with whom he would be 58 This hypothetical is loosely based on a lawsuit of ours, which was resolved to our satisfaction. We are unable, however, to discuss the specifics of that case and have altered thefacts to protect the anonymity of the parties involved.

Authors: Onwuachi-Willig, Angela., Murray, Melissa., Hamilton, Vivian. and Abrams, Kerry.
first   previous   Page 16 of 24   next   last



background image
\\server05\productn\H\HLC\44-1\HLC108.txt
unknown
Seq: 16
29-JAN-09
8:05
246
Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review
[Vol. 44
did not involve a claim of discrimination based on interraciality, we did
confront the question of how interraciality would fit into our factual allega-
tions, ultimately deciding to move forward with a more traditional and “rec-
ognizable” claim based on race.  In this Article, we use a hypothetical in
order to highlight the question of discrimination and interraciality and em-
phasize the difficulties that interracial, heterosexual couples can face in hav-
ing their claims fully embraced and acknowledged by the law.
Hypothetical
Consider, for example, the hypothetical case of a married couple
—An-
drew Williams, a black man, and Jackie Owens, a white woman.
58
 Andrew
and Jackie live in a large city on the East Coast, where Andrew works as a
doctor at a prominent hospital and Jackie works as a high school teacher.
Two years earlier, they had relocated from a large Midwestern city, where
they lived in a suburban house they owned jointly.  Upon moving, they sold
their house and rented an apartment in the bustling city-center, close to An-
drew’s new hospital.  They enjoyed the experience of living in the city, but
wanted to move to a quieter, more residential area.  Because they planned to
wait a few more years before purchasing their own house, they looked for
another apartment or house to rent in a nearby suburb.
Andrew and Jackie found an advertisement for a two-bedroom apart-
ment on a website with local rental listings.  They called the landlord/owner
to set up an appointment to view the apartment.  Although the landlord could
not meet them personally, he arranged a time for a rental agent to show
Andrew and Jackie the apartment.
When Andrew and Jackie arrived for their appointment, they found the
house attractive and well-maintained, and they appreciated its location on a
quiet tree-lined street.  While Andrew checked out the lawn, Jackie rang the
doorbell and was greeted warmly with a handshake by the rental agent,
Betty, who was white.  When Andrew walked up behind Jackie and intro-
duced himself as Jackie’s husband, Betty’s demeanor seemed to change.
Betty greeted Andrew only verbally and quickly turned her back to begin the
tour of the apartment.  Both Andrew and Jackie noted Betty’s odd behavior
but quickly put it out of their minds as they toured the apartment.
As they viewed the apartment, Andrew and Jackie fell in love with it.
Immediately after finishing the tour, Andrew called the landlord from the car
to express their desire to rent the property.  The landlord seemed very happy
that they were interested, and he explained that he already had other applica-
tions for the apartment, but had not yet made a decision.  He instructed them
to leave their application with the rental agent with whom he would be
58
This hypothetical is loosely based on a lawsuit of ours, which was resolved to our
satisfaction.  We are unable, however, to discuss the specifics of that case and have altered the
facts to protect the anonymity of the parties involved.


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 16 of 24   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.