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Guantánamo's Racialized Space: Created by "Anglo Superiority" (1898) and Sustained with Detention (2002 - ?)

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Abstract:

This paper examines the U.S. base in Guantánamo, Cuba as a racialized space from its creation during U.S. occupation of Cuba in 1898 to current detention reserved primarily to persons of color. The base is a product of the Platt Amendment (1901), making Cuba a U.S. protectorate, denying Cuba full sovereignty, and requiring a U.S. base in Cuban territory. Race justified these sovereignty limitations. Notions of Anglo superiority, “Latin,” black, and mixed-race inability to govern, and Protestant missions characterized U.S. foreign relations with Cuba and the world. Military and economic objectives required Cuba lease a base to the U.S., under present non-sovereign terms. Historic racial power in foreign relations and international law created Guantánamo. Race similarly colors detention in the “War on Terror.” While detainees, including those released, total over 700 and represent 47 nationalities detention is primarily reserved to South Asian, Middle-Eastern, or Arab identities. Painting detainees as “jihadists” serves as proxies for Muslim detention. “Unlawful enemy combatant” classifications mimic historic identities of the “savage.” Detainees are while "savages" were excluded from international law protections. Race whether tied to nationality, religion, or neo-savagery, characterizes Guantánamo, illuminating critical commonalities in myriad nationalities and detainee classifications. Despite diverse identities, being in Guantánamo’s legal space imposes these commonalities. Foreign relations history created racialized space. Detention keeps it current. Using insights from geography, post-colonialism, and history, this paper identifies racialized power in the law and asks how rights protections may check this power in U.S. peripheries.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

law (179), state (174), u.s (157), base (139), see (139), coloni (117), cuba (107), unit (97), intern (97), legal (95), guantanamo (92), empir (91), post (89), constitut (82), sovereignti (79), post-coloni (77), detent (68), oversea (67), right (67), foreign (65), 14 (61),
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Name: The Law and Society Association
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http://www.lawandsociety.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p304360_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Hernandez-Lopez, Ernesto. "Guantánamo's Racialized Space: Created by "Anglo Superiority" (1898) and Sustained with Detention (2002 - ?)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Grand Hyatt, Denver, Colorado, May 25, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p304360_index.html>

APA Citation:

Hernandez-Lopez, E. , 2009-05-25 "Guantánamo's Racialized Space: Created by "Anglo Superiority" (1898) and Sustained with Detention (2002 - ?)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Grand Hyatt, Denver, Colorado Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-29 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p304360_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the U.S. base in Guantánamo, Cuba as a racialized space from its creation during U.S. occupation of Cuba in 1898 to current detention reserved primarily to persons of color. The base is a product of the Platt Amendment (1901), making Cuba a U.S. protectorate, denying Cuba full sovereignty, and requiring a U.S. base in Cuban territory. Race justified these sovereignty limitations. Notions of Anglo superiority, “Latin,” black, and mixed-race inability to govern, and Protestant missions characterized U.S. foreign relations with Cuba and the world. Military and economic objectives required Cuba lease a base to the U.S., under present non-sovereign terms. Historic racial power in foreign relations and international law created Guantánamo. Race similarly colors detention in the “War on Terror.” While detainees, including those released, total over 700 and represent 47 nationalities detention is primarily reserved to South Asian, Middle-Eastern, or Arab identities. Painting detainees as “jihadists” serves as proxies for Muslim detention. “Unlawful enemy combatant” classifications mimic historic identities of the “savage.” Detainees are while "savages" were excluded from international law protections. Race whether tied to nationality, religion, or neo-savagery, characterizes Guantánamo, illuminating critical commonalities in myriad nationalities and detainee classifications. Despite diverse identities, being in Guantánamo’s legal space imposes these commonalities. Foreign relations history created racialized space. Detention keeps it current. Using insights from geography, post-colonialism, and history, this paper identifies racialized power in the law and asks how rights protections may check this power in U.S. peripheries.


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