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The Underpinnings of Political Trust across Levels of Government

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Abstract:

The United States has a federalist system in which authority is shared between national, state, and local governments. Yet, extant research focuses almost exclusively on trust in the national government. Hibbing et al. find higher approval for state governments, but, does this pattern also exist for trust? To address this and related questions, we use data from a statewide survey of Kentucky residents commissioned for this purpose. Specifically, our survey includes measures of political trust at the local, state, and national levels.
Furthermore, extant research has yet to reach a consensus regarding the factors that influence political trust. That is, harking back to the Citrin-Miller debate, what specifically do citizens have in mind when citizens formulate their trust evaluations? The standard trust question simply asks the extent to which citizens trust the government “to do what is right.” Yet it is likely that different citizens have different things in mind when responding to the question. Thus, immediately after respondents give their trust assessment, the survey we have commissioned asks an open-ended question about the factors that influenced their response. From these responses we are able to judge how the political actors, conditions, and attitudes that influence citizens’ trust evaluations vary across levels of government. Preliminary results suggest that citizens have a reasonable understanding of the policy responsibilities of the different levels of government and that they hold the appropriate level of government accountable when making their trust assessments.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

govern (230), trust (190), state (94), nation (84), polit (72), respons (59), respond (57), level (52), citizen (52), counti (40), individu (37), local (37), politician (35), time (33), differ (30), war (28), signific (28), end (26), polici (24), evalu (24), survey (24),

Author's Keywords:

trust, attitude formation
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Association:
Name: ISPP 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting
URL:
http://ispp.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p304739_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Plane, Dennis. and Gershtenson, Joseph. "The Underpinnings of Political Trust across Levels of Government" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland, Jul 14, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p304739_index.html>

APA Citation:

Plane, D. L. and Gershtenson, J. , 2009-07-14 "The Underpinnings of Political Trust across Levels of Government" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland Online <PDF>. 2014-11-29 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p304739_index.html

Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The United States has a federalist system in which authority is shared between national, state, and local governments. Yet, extant research focuses almost exclusively on trust in the national government. Hibbing et al. find higher approval for state governments, but, does this pattern also exist for trust? To address this and related questions, we use data from a statewide survey of Kentucky residents commissioned for this purpose. Specifically, our survey includes measures of political trust at the local, state, and national levels.
Furthermore, extant research has yet to reach a consensus regarding the factors that influence political trust. That is, harking back to the Citrin-Miller debate, what specifically do citizens have in mind when citizens formulate their trust evaluations? The standard trust question simply asks the extent to which citizens trust the government “to do what is right.” Yet it is likely that different citizens have different things in mind when responding to the question. Thus, immediately after respondents give their trust assessment, the survey we have commissioned asks an open-ended question about the factors that influenced their response. From these responses we are able to judge how the political actors, conditions, and attitudes that influence citizens’ trust evaluations vary across levels of government. Preliminary results suggest that citizens have a reasonable understanding of the policy responsibilities of the different levels of government and that they hold the appropriate level of government accountable when making their trust assessments.


Similar Titles:
National-State Government Policy Cycles in American Federalism: Fluctuations in Policy Outputs

Local Media, Public Opinion, and State Government Policy: Second-Level Agenda Setting and Political Bias

Connecting Citizens to Government: Using GIS to Understand How Individuals Evaluate Local Government Performance


 
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