Citation

Race and Gender in The Bondwoman’s Narrative and Clotel: Resistance to 19th Century White Supremacy

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Abstract:

Henry Louis Gates’ second edition of The Bondwoman’s Narrative offers abundant evidence to authenticate the racial make up of the author, as well as to establish her diverse literary influences. While Gates and his peers have made significant forward strides in the recovery and study of Crafts and her novel, I maintain that they have neglected a key analysis which would further support their findings that Hannah Crafts is indeed a black woman, and also situate her literary influence as distinctly African American. There are clear indications that The Bondwoman’s Narrative embodies the very topos of the Black Feminist Literary Tradition which Patricia Hill Collins discusses in Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment.
This paper aims to examine the nascent Black Feminist thought in Hannah Crafts’ The Bondwoman’s Narrative by drawing a comparison to William Wells Brown’s Clotel. Crafts’ novel resists the racialized and gendered concepts of African American women in the antebellum United States, and it refutes nineteenth-century white supremacist ideology. Specifically, The Bondwoman’s Narrative enters a space of resistance by inverting the widely-accepted mulatta archetype and replacing denigrated images of black women with multifarious portraits. The paper argues that, while Hannah Crafts resists white supremacist thought, specifically those represented in Thomas Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia, Brown, through his depiction of Clotel, reifies the racist ideology.
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Association:
Name: 33rd Annual National Council for Black Studies
URL:
http://www.ncbsonline.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p305507_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Kirlew, Shauna. "Race and Gender in The Bondwoman’s Narrative and Clotel: Resistance to 19th Century White Supremacy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 33rd Annual National Council for Black Studies, Renaissance Atlanta Hotel Downtown, Atlanta, GA, Mar 19, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p305507_index.html>

APA Citation:

Kirlew, S. M. , 2009-03-19 "Race and Gender in The Bondwoman’s Narrative and Clotel: Resistance to 19th Century White Supremacy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 33rd Annual National Council for Black Studies, Renaissance Atlanta Hotel Downtown, Atlanta, GA <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p305507_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Henry Louis Gates’ second edition of The Bondwoman’s Narrative offers abundant evidence to authenticate the racial make up of the author, as well as to establish her diverse literary influences. While Gates and his peers have made significant forward strides in the recovery and study of Crafts and her novel, I maintain that they have neglected a key analysis which would further support their findings that Hannah Crafts is indeed a black woman, and also situate her literary influence as distinctly African American. There are clear indications that The Bondwoman’s Narrative embodies the very topos of the Black Feminist Literary Tradition which Patricia Hill Collins discusses in Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment.
This paper aims to examine the nascent Black Feminist thought in Hannah Crafts’ The Bondwoman’s Narrative by drawing a comparison to William Wells Brown’s Clotel. Crafts’ novel resists the racialized and gendered concepts of African American women in the antebellum United States, and it refutes nineteenth-century white supremacist ideology. Specifically, The Bondwoman’s Narrative enters a space of resistance by inverting the widely-accepted mulatta archetype and replacing denigrated images of black women with multifarious portraits. The paper argues that, while Hannah Crafts resists white supremacist thought, specifically those represented in Thomas Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia, Brown, through his depiction of Clotel, reifies the racist ideology.


Similar Titles:
French Feminisms and Empire: Gender, Race, and Liberatory Ideals in 19th Century France

Race, Gender, and the Modern White Supremacy Movement: The Intersection of “Isms” and Organized Racist Groups


 
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