Citation

Immigration Policy Preferences, Welfare State features, and Labor Market Regulation: An analysis based on European data

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

The literature on immigration policy preferences in advanced industrialized countries has focused attention on such phenomena as the perceived welfare costs of immmigrantion and the "low skill" profile of much immigration into the OECD in recent decades. These are often identified as causes of either "welfare chauvinism" (i.e. negative attitudes towards immigration and the rise of anti-immigrant parties) or welfare retrenchement (due to an increase in the relative skill level of native voters and/or a reduction in social solidarity due to greater social heterogeneity). In this paper I argue that analyses explaining immigration policy preferences in terms of immigrant skill-levels and social spending levels alone do not go far enough. Rather, I hypothesize that specific features of welfare states, such as relative measures of family income support, as well as child and elder care provision have a major impact on attitudes towards immigration among different segments of voters (including different occupational groups and voters with different family structures). Differences in immigration policy preferences based on welfare state features are further mediated by the character of labor market regulation across countries, which produces different levels of perceived competition from immigrants and different perceived benefits to the cost of living/labor market productivity of voters in different occupational groups. The hypotheses are tested on immigration policy preferences data derived from a number of Eurobarometer surveys across time and data on immigration and labor market regulation measures provided by the OECD. The quantitative results are followed by a discussion of the politics behind immigration policy changes in the UK, France, Germany, Spain, and Italy over the last two decades.
Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: SASE Annual Conference
URL:
http://www.sase.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p305777_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Perez, Sofia. "Immigration Policy Preferences, Welfare State features, and Labor Market Regulation: An analysis based on European data" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Sciences Po, Paris, France, Jul 16, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p305777_index.html>

APA Citation:

Perez, S. , 2009-07-16 "Immigration Policy Preferences, Welfare State features, and Labor Market Regulation: An analysis based on European data" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Sciences Po, Paris, France <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p305777_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The literature on immigration policy preferences in advanced industrialized countries has focused attention on such phenomena as the perceived welfare costs of immmigrantion and the "low skill" profile of much immigration into the OECD in recent decades. These are often identified as causes of either "welfare chauvinism" (i.e. negative attitudes towards immigration and the rise of anti-immigrant parties) or welfare retrenchement (due to an increase in the relative skill level of native voters and/or a reduction in social solidarity due to greater social heterogeneity). In this paper I argue that analyses explaining immigration policy preferences in terms of immigrant skill-levels and social spending levels alone do not go far enough. Rather, I hypothesize that specific features of welfare states, such as relative measures of family income support, as well as child and elder care provision have a major impact on attitudes towards immigration among different segments of voters (including different occupational groups and voters with different family structures). Differences in immigration policy preferences based on welfare state features are further mediated by the character of labor market regulation across countries, which produces different levels of perceived competition from immigrants and different perceived benefits to the cost of living/labor market productivity of voters in different occupational groups. The hypotheses are tested on immigration policy preferences data derived from a number of Eurobarometer surveys across time and data on immigration and labor market regulation measures provided by the OECD. The quantitative results are followed by a discussion of the politics behind immigration policy changes in the UK, France, Germany, Spain, and Italy over the last two decades.


Similar Titles:
Low-Wage Immigrants, Labor Market Integration, and Unemployment Welfare Provisions in Developed EU Welfare States

Labor Market Competitors or Welfare State Freeloaders? The Role of Welfare State Benefits in European Anti-Immigration Sentiment


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.