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Childhood Interrupted: The Unique Role of Distress in Understanding the Effects of Divorce on Children’s Schooling

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Abstract:

The effect of divorce on children is typically understood as a result of changes occurring simultaneous with the divorce, more so than the actual divorce itself. Family economic conditions and parenting quality are two such explanations traditionally offered for the effect of divorce. Psychological distress is often studied as an outcome of divorce, but rarely is it considered as a mechanism through which divorce impacts other outcomes. Distress is thus tested as an intermediary between divorce and children’s schooling. The results show that distress explains a unique part of the divorce effect, and that the effect is independent of other changes taking place during the divorce process. The findings suggest that research on the impact of divorce needs to consider more than just changes to the circumstances that exist around a person, and include changes to internal conditions as well.

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divorc (226), children (146), parent (124), distress (112), effect (105), model (92), 1 (63), school (59), famili (57), resourc (53), child (46), chang (46), score (43), well (43), measur (41), time (40), impact (37), psycholog (36), studi (34), math (33), factor (33),
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Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.asanet.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p306620_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Potter, Daniel. "Childhood Interrupted: The Unique Role of Distress in Understanding the Effects of Divorce on Children’s Schooling" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 08, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p306620_index.html>

APA Citation:

Potter, D. J. , 2009-08-08 "Childhood Interrupted: The Unique Role of Distress in Understanding the Effects of Divorce on Children’s Schooling" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA Online <PDF>. 2014-11-29 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p306620_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The effect of divorce on children is typically understood as a result of changes occurring simultaneous with the divorce, more so than the actual divorce itself. Family economic conditions and parenting quality are two such explanations traditionally offered for the effect of divorce. Psychological distress is often studied as an outcome of divorce, but rarely is it considered as a mechanism through which divorce impacts other outcomes. Distress is thus tested as an intermediary between divorce and children’s schooling. The results show that distress explains a unique part of the divorce effect, and that the effect is independent of other changes taking place during the divorce process. The findings suggest that research on the impact of divorce needs to consider more than just changes to the circumstances that exist around a person, and include changes to internal conditions as well.


Similar Titles:
Psychological Resources among New Parents and Children’s Behavioral Outcomes: Change Over Time and Mechanisms of Transmission

21. Psychological or Resource Factors: What Explains the Effect of Family Instability on Children’s Math Trajectories?


 
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