Citation

Trash Talkers and Divers: Soccer’s Gendered Structure

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

Throughout the world, many countries have seen an increase in female soccer participation (cf. Hong and Mangan 2004). In 2003 in the US, there were 9.1 million girls registered, accounting for 45 percent of all soccer players in this country (SICA). In most countries, women’s participation in the male domain of sport has been “contested ideological terrain” (Messner 1988:198) and met with resistance. Given these circumstances, the growth of women’s soccer would seem to indicate movement towards greater gender equality. The goals of our paper are twofold. Firstly, using historical and demographic data, we suggest that soccer has been constructed as a “less masculine” sport in the US (compared to other mainstays such as football, basketball, or baseball). Secondly, using data gathered from participant observation and in-depth interviews, we argue that that gendered styles of play (in particular, the way women and men show aggression, “dive,” and “talk trash”) reflect and reproduce male privilege. In so doing, our analysis extends upon Messner’s (2000) argument that “doing gender” (West and Zimmerman 1987) on the playing field is an intertwined product of “interaction, structural context, and culture” (2000: 767). To be more specific, we show how the social context of youth soccer (a sport constructed as “sissy” in the US), uniquely enables and constrains gender performance.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

soccer (139), sport (66), player (66), gender (59), play (58), women (57), team (41), game (31), one (31), us (29), girl (29), femal (26), boy (25), footbal (22), kooistra (22), male (21), youth (21), particip (21), may (21), physic (21), field (20),
Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.asanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p307233_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Kooistra, Paul. and Kolb, Kenneth. "Trash Talkers and Divers: Soccer’s Gendered Structure" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 07, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p307233_index.html>

APA Citation:

Kooistra, P. and Kolb, K. H. , 2009-08-07 "Trash Talkers and Divers: Soccer’s Gendered Structure" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-29 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p307233_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Throughout the world, many countries have seen an increase in female soccer participation (cf. Hong and Mangan 2004). In 2003 in the US, there were 9.1 million girls registered, accounting for 45 percent of all soccer players in this country (SICA). In most countries, women’s participation in the male domain of sport has been “contested ideological terrain” (Messner 1988:198) and met with resistance. Given these circumstances, the growth of women’s soccer would seem to indicate movement towards greater gender equality. The goals of our paper are twofold. Firstly, using historical and demographic data, we suggest that soccer has been constructed as a “less masculine” sport in the US (compared to other mainstays such as football, basketball, or baseball). Secondly, using data gathered from participant observation and in-depth interviews, we argue that that gendered styles of play (in particular, the way women and men show aggression, “dive,” and “talk trash”) reflect and reproduce male privilege. In so doing, our analysis extends upon Messner’s (2000) argument that “doing gender” (West and Zimmerman 1987) on the playing field is an intertwined product of “interaction, structural context, and culture” (2000: 767). To be more specific, we show how the social context of youth soccer (a sport constructed as “sissy” in the US), uniquely enables and constrains gender performance.


Similar Titles:
Sports Commentary: Comparing Male and Female Announcers During Women's NCAA Tournament Games

Women in Full-Contact Sports: The Case of Female Football Players

Uneven Playing Fields: State Variations in Boy's and Girl's Access to and Participation in Interscholastic Sports


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.